3 Weeks to a 30 Minute Running Habit

How to Get Started With Running

Man jogging outside urban building
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This beginner running program is designed to encourage a new running habit. To get started, you only need to be able to run for 1 minute at a time. By the end of three weeks, you'll be able to run/walk for 30 minutes and be on your way to continuing your new running habit.

If you haven't had a recent physical, visit your health care professional to get cleared for running.

Notes about the schedule:
This program is a run/walk to continuous running program, so some of your workout instructions will displayed in run/walk intervals.

The first number displayed will be the amount of minutes to run and the second number is the amount to walk. So, for example, 1/1 means run for 1 minute, then walk for 1 minute.

You should start each run with a 5-10 minute warm-up walk or slow jog. Finish up with a 5-10 minute cool-down walk or slow jog.

Don't run on your rest days. You should take off completely or do cross-training, which can be walking, biking, swimming, yoga, strength-training or any other activity (other than running) that you enjoy. If you feel like you need another rest day, that's fine -- just pick up the training schedule where you left off.

Day 1: 1/1 x 10 (Run 1 minute, walk 1 minute, ten times, for a total of 20 minutes.)

Day 2: 1/1 x 10

Day 3: Rest

Day 4: 2/1 x5, then 1/1 x5

Day 5: 2/1 x5, then 1/1 x5

Day 6: Rest

Day 7: 2/1 x6

Day 8: 3/1 x4, then 1/1 x4

Day 9: 2/1 x 6

Day 10: Rest

Day 11: 3/1 x5

Day 12: 2/1 x8

Day 13: Rest

Day 14: 3/1 x5

Day 15: 4/1 x4

Day 16: 2/1 x8

Day 17: 5/1 x4

Day 18: Rest

Day 19: 4/1 x6

Day 20: 2/1 x5

Day 21: 5/1 x5

FAQs About Training
What If I Have to Miss a Day of Training?
When Should I Replace My Running Shoes?
When Is It OK to Run Through Pain?
Should I Eat Before a Run?
Is It Better to Run Outside or on a Treadmill?

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