4 Weeks to One Mile Program - Week One

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This four-week training program is designed for total beginner run/walkers who want to build up to running a mile. This program is a run/walk to continuous running program. Each week, you'll make a slight increase to your running distance and a decrease in your walking distance. By the end of four weeks, you'll be able to run one mile without stopping.

Week 1 Training:

Day 1: Run 1/16 mile, walk 3/16 mile – repeat 4 times (Track equivalent: Run 1/4 of a lap, walk 3/4 of a lap – repeat 4 times)
Day 2: Rest or cross-train
Day 3: Run 1/16 mile, walk 3/16 mile – repeat 4 times (Track equivalent: Run 1/4 of a lap, walk 3/4 of a lap – repeat 4 times)
Day 4: Rest
Day 5: Run 1/16 mile, walk 3/16 mile – repeat 4 times (Track equivalent: Run 1/4 of a lap, walk 3/4 of a lap – repeat 4 times)
Day 6: Rest or cross-train
Day 7: Rest


Notes about the training schedule:

For measuring purposes, it's best to do these workouts on a track, which is usually 400 meters, or about 1/4 of a mile. Each workout will have the track equivalent, so you know how far you should be running and walking.

You should start each run with a 5-10 minute warm-up walk. You can also do some warm-up exercises. Finish up with a 5-10 minute cool-down walk and some stretching.

You don't have to do your runs on specific days; however, you should try not to run two days in a row. It's better to take a rest day or do cross-training on the days in between runs as your body is adapting to the training. Cross-training can be walking, yoga, biking, swimming, or another activity (other than running) that you enjoy.

Training Advice for Week One:

The Absolute Beginner's Guide to Running: Starting a new running habit can feel overwhelming to a beginner runner. Here are some of the basics about running to help you get started.



How Fast Should I Run?: One of the most common questions new runners ask is, "How fast should I run?" Get the answer.

How Should I Breathe When Running?: What's the best way to breathe while running? Get the answer.

Why Cross-Train: Cross-training is any sport or exercise that supplements your main sport -- in this case, running.

Here's why and how to cross-train.

How Do I Avoid Side Stitches?:  Side stitches, or cramps under your rib cage, are common among beginner runners. Find out how to prevent them and get rid of them if you experience one.

How Do I Get Over Feeling Self-Conscious About Running?: Are you nervous or afraid to run in public? Follow these tips to get over your fear.

Rules for Running on a Track: Here are some basic safety and etiquette rules for running on a track.

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