Almond and Buckwheat Applesauce Granola

Almond and Buckwheat Homemade Granola
Stephanie Lang, MS, RDN, CDN
Total Time 60 min
Prep 15 min, Cook 45 min
Yield 10, 0.5 cup portions (281 cals)

Store bought granola can be high in added sugar and fat. This recipe cuts down on both by using applesauce as the main natural sweetener and binder, with a little olive oil and maple syrup for balance and flavor.

Almonds contain vitamin E, which acts as an antioxidant that helps reduce damage to tissues. Almonds also contain a mixture of fat, fiber, and protein, all of which keep you satiated and can prevent overeating.

Buckwheat groats are the hulled seeds of the buckwheat plant. These high fiber, high protein seeds are tender and can be eaten raw (often, they are soaked first) or cooked. Buckwheat groats are traditionally prepared in an Eastern European dish known as kasha, but they are surprisingly tasty in this granola, too.

Ingredients

  • 3.5 cups rolled oats
  • 1 cup almonds, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 cup raw buckwheat groats
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup raisins

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 325F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silpat.
  2. In a large bowl, stir together the oats, almonds, buckwheat groats, and salt.
  3. Add the applesauce, olive oil, and maple syrup and mix everything together with a spatula.
  4. Spread the mixture in an even layer onto the baking sheet.
  5. Bake for 45 minutes, stirring once every 10 minutes, until lightly toasted.
  6. Take out from the oven and stir in the raisins.

    Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

    Granola is very versatile and can be made with a variety of different types of nuts and dried fruit. Experiment with whatever odds and ends you have in your pantry.

    For an extra dose of omega-3 fatty acids, add a tablespoon or two of hemp seeds or ground flaxseed.

    Try this recipe with pumpkin puree instead of applesauce for an extra boost of vitamin A. Or use honey instead of maple syrup for a flavor variation. Do note that both honey and maple syrup contain the same amount of carbohydrates and sugar.

    Cooking and Serving Tips

    Make your own applesauce. Peel and slice apples and add to a pot with a cup or so of water or apple cider and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 20 to 30 minutes, until the apples are soft. Puree using an immersion blender or add to a food processor or blender and whiz until smoothie.

    Keep it basic, or stir in flavors like cinnamon and brown sugar for a cozy twist.

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