AB&C Oat Cookies

ABandC Oat Cookies
Stephanie Lang, MS, RDN, CDN

Nutrition Highlights (per serving)

Calories 290
Fat 13g
Carbs 39g
Protein 9g
View All
Total Time 45 min
Prep 15 min, Cook 30 min
Servings 5 (2 cookies each)

Whip up a batch of these hearty cinnamon-scented cookies and you'll have a snack to enjoy all work (or school) week long. Two of these cookies contain 9 grams of fiber and 9 grams of protein, which will help keep you more satiated and energized than if you were to grab a generic pastry from the local deli or coffee shop.

Fiber-rich foods like whole grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds are linked to a reduced risk of cancer. One of the benefits of fiber is that it helps speed up ‘gut transit time,’ or how long food takes to move through the digestive tract, thus keeping you "regular." Soluble fiber dissolves in water to form a gel and is found in foods like beans, oats, apples, and flaxseed. This type of fiber may also help lower total blood cholesterol levels by lowering the "bad" low-density lipoprotein (LDL) type of cholesterol. Most adults need around 25 to 38 grams of fiber per day.

Ingredients

  • 2 medium bananas
  • 1/4 cup almond butter
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons ground flaxseed
  • 2 cups rolled oats
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cranberries
  • 2 tablespoons chia seeds

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. Place bananas in a blender and blend until liquid-like.
  3. Add in almond butter, flax, and cinnamon, and blend until smooth.
  4. Transfer to a large bowl and mix in the oats, chopped cranberries and chia seeds.
  5. Place in the refrigerator for 15 to 30 minutes to allow the mixture to firm up slightly.
  6. Form the mixture into 10 2-inch rounds. Place on the baking sheet and flatten. Bake for 30 minutes, rotating the baking sheet midway through baking.
  1. Serve the cookies with a warm mug of coffee or tea or a tall glass of milk.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

Instead of fresh cranberries, try fresh blueberries for another antioxidant-rich berry, stir in chopped apples for a fiberful crunch, or toss in raisins for a more classic dried fruit fix.

Vitamin A-rich pumpkin puree makes a great substitute for banana because they have a similar thick texture when blended and mashed into baked goods.

You can also use 1 cup pumpkin puree in place of the banana. If using pumpkin puree, you may want to add in a tablespoon of maple syrup because the pumpkin may not be as sweet as the banana.

Cooking and Serving Tips

Stock your kitchen with at least 2 kinds of "super seeds" for topping oatmeal, adding to smoothies, or using in baked goods and snacks. Ground flaxseeds, chia seeds, and hemp seeds are examples of tasty seeds that offer a plant-based dose of omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, and protein.

Buy in bulk and store in the refrigerator or freezer for maximum freshness.

Nutrition Facts
Servings: 5 (2 cookies each)
Amount per serving  
Calories 290
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 13g 17%
Saturated Fat 2g 10%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 38mg 2%
Total Carbohydrate 39g 14%
Dietary Fiber 9g 32%
Total Sugars 7g  
Includes 0g Added Sugars 0%
Protein 9g  
Vitamin D 0mcg 0%
Calcium 116mg 9%
Iron 3mg 17%
Potassium 440mg 9%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calorie a day is used for general nutrition advice.

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