Books About Building Kites

Flight is fascinating. While today we are all used to seeing airplanes in the sky and even flying in them ourselves, there was once a day when humans looked skyward and wondered at the flight of birds. Perhaps that's why children love to fly kites. And what is better than flying a kite you made yourself? You and your child can make some kites and then go out and fly them when the weather is warm and windy. Unless you're already a kite-building expert, you will probably need some instructions on how to build one. You and your child can start with some simple ones and move on to build some more complex ones.

Design Your Own Kite

Design Your Own Kite
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Even the youngest beginner can start making a kite with this kit. It is easy to assemble and comes complete with red, blue, yellow, and white paint as well as a brush so your child can personalize it just the way she wants. You can, of course, use your own paint or mix the colors if you want additional colors.Your child can also use crayons to personalize the kite even more. Imagine a kite with your child's wonderful artwork flying up in the sky. Better yet, imagine your child watching her own very special kite flying up in the sky!

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Asian Kites (Asian Arts and Crafts For Creative Kids)

Asian Kites (Asian Arts and Crafts For Creative Kids)
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This book has fourteen different projects, each one a kite from one of five Asian countries: China, Malaysia, Thailand, Korea, and Japan. Before providing instructions for the projects, the book provides information on materials needed for the kites, most of which can be found at home. But more than just covering the materials needed, the book also describes the various parts of a kite (frame, sail, tow point, knots) and the purpose of each one. In addition to that, the book covers various ways to decorate the kite, places to create the kite. It also talks about when and where to fly a kite. Each project starts with an age recommendation. Each then provides a list of supplies needed for the kite as well as diagrams that will help demonstrate the steps.

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25 Kites That Fly

25 Kites That Fly
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We are used to seeing the typical diamond-shaped (two-stick) kite, but there are many different kinds of kites. This book has 25 different kites you and your child can make - and they are sure to fly. After all, Leslie Hunt, the author, is a kite maker for the U.S. Weather Bureau. The 25 different kites include plane-surface kites, like the typical diamond-shaped kite, tailless kites like the balloon kite and box kite, and compound kites like a box kite with wings. The instructions include lists of materials needed to build the kites and the 70 illustrations throughout the book help make the instructions easy to follow.

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Easy-to-Make Decorative Kites: Step-by-Step Instructions

Easy-to-Make Decorative Kites: Step-by-Step Instructions
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In spite of the title, these kites aren't so easy to make, at least not for beginners. That doesn't mean that these are great kites to make! It just means that these might be kites for older kids to make. The kites include the European Diamond, the Japanese Red Devil Swooper, the Oriental Butterfly, the Korean Warrior, the Chinese Yüan, the Guatemalan Sun, the Traditional Chinese Dragonfly, and the New England Ghost. The instructions for each kite include materials needed and diagrams of the kites at different stages of construction. These kites might be more challenging to build, but that makes them perfect for older kids who have already mastered the basics of kite making.

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