Photos of Feet and X-rays with Bunion/HAV Deformities

Do You Have a Bunion?

1
Bunion/HAV Left Foot

Photo © Terence Vanderheiden, D.P.M.

Bunions, also known as hallux abducto valgus (HAV), are a very common problem, especially among women. Shoes can sometimes cause and contribute to the problem, but heredity also plays a big role in the development of bunions. Treatment may be as simple as wearing wider shoes. If the bunion is very painful and limits your activities, surgery may be needed. Learn more about the causes, symptoms and treatment options for bunions. For help with bunion pain, check out our 5 recommended products for bunions.

Notice the "bump" on the side of the foot near the base of the big toe. This is called a bunion.

2
Left Foot X-ray of Bunion/HAV

Photo © Terence Vanderheiden, D.P.M.

Notice the large angle between the first and second metatarsals. The larger this angle is, the more severe the bunion deformity.

3
Bunion/HAV Left Foot

Photo © Terence Vanderheiden, D.P.M.

Notice the redness on the side of the foot near the big toe joint. Because of the "bump" this area gets a lot of pressure from shoes that are too tight.

4
X-ray Right Foot with Bunion/HAV

Photo © Terence Vanderheiden, D.P.M.

Notice the two small circular bones under the first metatarsal head (big toe area). These are called sesamoids. When the sesamoids are not directly under the first metatarsal head, the big toe tends to drift more toward the second toe.

5
Bunion/HAV Right Foot

Photo © Terence Vanderheiden, D.P.M.

Bunions are also medically known as hallux abducto valgus (HAV). Hallux is another name for your big toe. Notice how the big toe turns and leans against the second toe.

Continue Reading