Clever Ideas for Dealing with Halloween Candy

For Yourself and Your Family

Girl with Halloween Candy
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Halloween is around the corner, which means there is sure to be an abundance of candy lurking around your office, in your home, in the stores, and in your child's school. It is no secret that candy isn't the best food choice. And while eating too much sugar won't give you diabetes, candy is a non-nutritious food choice that, when eaten in excess, can cause weight gain and blood sugar spikes. The question is, how can you prevent overindulging and set a good example for your family?

Resisting temptation can be hard but there are ways to do it. These tips can help you and your entire family

Buy Candy that You Don't Like: To make candy less tempting, buy candy you wouldn't care to eat, candy you don't even like. One of my patients turned me onto this idea. Although she knows it's best to avoid purchasing candy altogether, she likes to keep in the spirit of Halloween. In an effort to reduce temptation and prevent overeating or eating mindlessly, she purchases candy she doesn't like - this way she knows she won't eat it.

Outsmart Yourself: If you pass the candy bowl each time you go to the bathroom and find yourself grabbing a few candies along the way, aim to take a different route to your destination to avoid temptation. If an alternate route is not an option, keeping your mouth busy can help. Chew a piece of gum or carry your toothbrush with you to work - whenever you feel a craving coming on, brush your teeth instead.

 

Trade it in For Cash: This is a good tip for kids. It's fun to go trick-or-treating, but no one needs to eat a sack full of candy. Decide on a reasonable number per piece or based on weight and let your kids pick a few and trade the rest in for cash or a toy. You can even create healthy competition among siblings, the more candy they trade in the better the prize.

 

Barter for a Trip: Instead of trading candy in for cash, let your kids trade in their stash for a trip to the movies, ice skating, the zoo or whatever else is on their wish list. It will be fun for the whole family. 

Freeze it for Later: On Halloween night, set a rule that your child is allowed to have a certain number of candies and freeze the rest. You may let them have one piece each night for a week and trash the rest, or perhaps you can save them for longer and allow them to indulge in a treat from time to time. If you find that having candy in the freezer is tempting for you to eat, try to stash them in a place that is hard to get to. If the candies are hard to find, it will be less tempting for you to eat - just being able to stop yourself in the moment is enough time to change your mind and avoid eating something you know isn't good for you. 

Resources: 

American Diabetes Association. Understanding Carbohydrates: Sugar and Desserts. Accessed on-line. October 1, 2015: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/understanding-carbohydrates/sugar-and-desserts.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

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