What Is Stable Disease?

What Is Stable Disease in the Spectrum of Cancer Responses?

female doctor reading a chest x-ray to determine treatment response
What is the meaning of the term stable disease?. Istockphoto.com/Stock Photo©InnerVisionPRO

Definition: Stable Disease

Cancer doctors use the term stable disease to describe a tumor that is neither growing nor shrinking. Stable disease also means that no new tumors have developed and that the cancer has not spread to any new regions of the body (the cancer is not getting better or worse and has not metastasized further).

Where is Stable Disease in the Spectrum of Treatment Response?

To understand medical terms describing response to treatment and survival rates, it can help to know where on a line the term follows.

 Stable disease would be defined as being a little better than progressive disease, which means that a tumor has increased in size by at least 20 percent, and a little worse than a partial response, which means that a tumor has decreased in size by at least 50 percent.

In other words, stable disease means that a cancer has changed very little, and if it has changed, it has not grown more than 50 percent in size or decreased more than 30 percent in size.  

Limitations in Determining Change in Tumors

Why would a tumor be considered stable if it had, for example, increased in size by 10 percent to 20 percent? The primary reason is that the techniques we have to determine the size of a tumor are limited by our ability to visualize tumors indirectly, as with imaging tests such as CT scans and PET scans. The size of a tumor may appear slightly different for two different radiologists reading the same films, or the tumor may  be looked at from slightly different angles at different times the scans are done.

Does Stable Disease Mean a Treatment is Not Working?

It's also important to note that "stable disease" can mean that a treatment is working very well. If a tumor would be expected to have grown in the interval between two scans and has remained stable, it may mean that the treatment is working well—even if there is not much of a change seen on scans.

 A cancer may also be stable—and the treatment working—if it's expected that the tumor would have spread to another region of the body at the time of the second scan.

Other Terms Describing Cancer Response to Treatment

It can be helpful to define a few other terms that your oncologist may use in describing your response to cancer treatment.

  • The terms no evidence of disease (NED), complete response, and complete remission mean that no sign of cancer is present on any imaging studies. They do not mean the cancer is gone, just that, with the technology we currently have, no cancer can be found.
  • The term recurrence means that a cancer has come back after being NED or in remission. 
  • The term response means that at treatment appears to be working and can be defined as a minor response (it decreased the size of a tumor by 25 percent to 50 percent) a partial response (it decreased the size of a cancer or the spread of a cancer, or the two combined by at least 50 percent) or a complete response (no evidence of cancer remains.)
  • The term progressive disease means that a cancer is getting worse. and that it has increased or spread by more than 50 percent.
  • The term clinical benefit may mean that a tumor has decreased in size, or may just mean that the size of a tumor has remained stable if would otherwise have been expected to grow.

Summary of Stable Disease 

Since metastatic disease—that is, cancer that has spread to another region of the body—is responsible for at least 80 percent of deaths from cancer, coping with the fear of recurrence or progression of cancer is one of the greatest fears for people living with cancer. Stable disease is, therefore, a reassuring sign for many people, and even if the response to treatment isn't what you had hope for, stable disease also means that there is still the hope that a new treatment - one which works better - will still be available in your lifetime.

Also Known As: static disease, SD

Examples: On Jon's report from his oncologist, he read that he had stable disease after his radiation therapy for lung cancer.

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