Devil's Claw - Possible Herbal Interactions

devils claw: harpagophytum procumbens seed case evolved fo r dispersal. south africa
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Devil's claw supplements haven't been tested for safety and keep in mind that the safety of supplements in pregnant women, nursing mothers, children, and those with medical conditions or who are taking medications has not been established. You can get tips on using supplements here, but if you're considering the use of devil's claw, talk with your doctor first. Please note that this is only a partial list (please consult your doctor for a complete list).

 Some of the possible herb-drug interactions may include:

Anticoagulants

e.g. Warfarin 
Devil's claw should not be taken with anticoagulant drugs (blood-thinners), such as warfarin. Taken together, they may increase the risk of bleeding or cause spontaneous bleeding.

Metformin

Metformin is used as a treatment for hyperglycemia in people with type 2 non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Based on one animal study, which found devil's claw extract reduced blood glucose in fasted normal and diabetic animals, metformin should not be combined with devil's claw unless under the supervision of a qualified health practitioner.

Insulin or Insulin Analogs

Insulin and Insulin Analogs are used for diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder in which the pancreas does not make enough insulin. One animal study found devil's claw extract reduced blood glucose in fasted normal and diabetic animals. Based on these preliminary findings, do not take these drugs together with devil's claw.

Sulfonylureas

Sulfonylureas helps to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. One drug in this class, called chlorpropamide, is used as a treatment for diabetes insipidus. Based on one animal study, which found devil's claw extract reduced blood glucose in fasted normal and diabetic animals, sulfonylureas should not be combined with devil's claw unless under the supervision of a qualified health practitioner.

There are many other possible drug interactions. If you are considering using saw palmetto, talk with your doctor first.

Sources

Griffith, H. Winter. Complete Guide to Prescription and Nonprescription Drugs 2006 Edition. New York: Perigree, 2005.

Mahomed IM and Ojewole JA. "Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic properties of Harpagophytum
procumbens DC (Pedaliaceae) secondary root aqueous extract." Phytotherapy Research. 18.12 (2004):982-9.

Disclaimer: The information contained on this site is intended for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for advice, diagnosis or treatment by a licensed physician. It is not meant to cover all possible precautions, drug interactions, circumstances or adverse effects. You should seek prompt medical care for any health issues and consult your doctor before using alternative medicine or making a change to your regimen.

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