Gallery of Eye Disease Simulations

An image gallery of eye disease simulations.

1
Normal Vision

Normal vision
Normal vision. Image © National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health

Eye disease affects vision in many ways. The following series of photographs from the National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, depicts the affects eye disease may have on a person's view of the world.

A scene as it might look to a person with normal vision. Normal vision occurs when light is focused directly on the retina rather than in front or behind it.

2
Myopia (Nearsightedness)

Myopia
Myopia. Image © National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health.

A scene as it might look to a person with myopia (nearsightedness). Myopia is an eye problem that causes objects at a distance to be blurry. A nearsighted person can clearly see objects that are close to him, but has a hard time focusing on objects that are far away.

Read about myopia.

3
Cataract

Cataract
Cataract. Image © National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health.

A scene as it might look to a person with cataract. A cataract is a clouding of the eye's lens. Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness among people older than 55. Cataracts make your visual field appear fuzzy or blurry.

Learn about cataracts.

4
Glaucoma

Glaucoma. Image © National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health.

A scene as it might look to a person with glaucoma. Glaucoma has been nicknamed "the sneak thief of sight" because it often goes undetected and causes irreversible damage to the eye. As the disease progresses, vision seems to fluctuate and peripheral vision fails. If left untreated, vision can be reduced to tunnel vision and eventually, total blindness.

Learn about glaucoma.

5
Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration
Macular degeneration. Image © National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health.

A scene as it might look to a person with macular degeneration. Vision loss in early cases of macular degeneration is so gradual that most people do not notice it. Pain is not usually experienced. As the disease progresses, vision may be blurred and objects may appear distorted. Patients may complain of missing letters in words or difficulty seeing smaller print.

Learn about macular degeneration.

6
Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy. Image © National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health.

A scene as it might look to a person with diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness in American adults. As retinopathy advances, patients may complain of specks, spots or floaters. Central vision may become blurred or go in and out of focus. Some may complain of streaks or blockage of vision if a large hemorrhage occurs inside the eye, and others may notice difficulty seeing at night.

Learn about diabetic retinopathy.

7
Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa
Retinitis pigmentosa. Image © National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health.

A scene as it might look to a person with retinitis pigmentosa. Retinitis pigmentosa, or RP, is the name given to a group of inherited eye diseases that affect the retina. The symptoms of RP are usually noticed in children, adolescents, and young adults, with progression of the disease continuing throughout life. The main sign of the disease is the presence of dark pigmented spots in the retina.

Learn about retinitis pigmentosa.

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