First Aid and Safety Photos

First Aid and Safety

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Butterfly Stitches

Butterfly Stitches
First Aid and Safety Photos Butterfly Stitches. Photo (c) Marissa Childs

A first aid and safety photo gallery to help you learn how to keep your kids safe, review hidden dangers, and be prepared when your kids get hurt.

See photos of kids after getting common cuts and scrapes, a dog bite, sprains, and after being treated with basic first aid, including using an ice pack and getting stitches.

Also review common safety hazards including mistakes parents make with car seats, pool safety hazards, and other things to make sure your home is childproofed and your kids are safe.

Butterfly stitches can be a good alternative to regular stitches for mild cuts and lacerations.

If your child gets cut, after you stop the bleeding and clean the wound, if the edges of the wound don't easily stay together and are gaping open, then he may need stitches. A butterfly bandage can be an alternative for minor wounds that aren't quite deep enough for stitches but still need something to keep the edges together.

Even for deeper cuts, butterfly bandages or stitches can help to temporarily bring the sides of the cut together until you can get to the ER or your doctor.

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A Baby Reaching for a Hot Stove

A Baby Reaching for a Hot Stove
First Aid and Safety Photos A Baby Reaching for a Hot Stove. Photo (c) Renee Lee

This photo of a baby reaching for a hot stove shows how easy it is to forget about common safety hazards when childproofing your home.

A stove guard would be a good way to help you childproof the stove from this baby. That way, she will be less likely to be able to reach up and touch the burners, touch hot pots and pans as she gets older, or have hot water or oil spatter out on her.

Other childproofing items that would help make this stove safe include an appliance strap to keep the oven locked and covers for the stove dials so that she can't turn the gas on by herself.

An appliance strap to 'lock' the stove the wall would also be a good idea, just in case she does open the oven and step onto the oven door, which could otherwise cause the whole stove to tip over on top of her.

Using a 'layers of protection' strategy, in addition to the above safety tips, you might also have safety gates keeping the kitchen off-limits, so that she can safely walk around and explore the rest of the house.

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Is this child ready for seat belts?

Ready For Seat Belts?
First Aid and Safety Photos Ready For Seat Belts?. Photo (c) Stila Goh

Is this child ready for seat belts? He is clearly not, since the shoulder belt is across his neck and the lap belt in on his tummy.

Although many parents use car seats for their infants, toddlers, and preschool age children, many drop the ball and take their kids out of their child's booster seat way too early.

Remember that older kids should usually be in a booster seat until they are about 4-feet 9-inches tall and are between 8 and 12 years old, when a car's regular seat belts will usually fit them well.

Signs that seat belts fit your child include that the shoulder belt fits across your child's shoulder, does not go on his neck, and you don't have to put it behind him. Also, the lap belt should fit low on his hips and not on his abdomen.

According to the latest car seat guidelines, kids should move to a belt-positioning booster seat when they reach the weight and height harness strap limits of their forward-facing car seat. Again, the move to regular seat belts should not occur until kids are "old enough and large enough" for the seat belts to protect them properly, which usually isn't until they are 4 feet 9 inches tall (57 inches) and are between 8 and 12 years old.

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First Aid for a Sprained Wrist

First Aid for Sprained Wrist
First Aid and Safety Photos First Aid for Sprained Wrist. Photo (c) Sean Locke

Children often hurt their wrist after falls playing sports or riding their bike, etc., causing sprains and sometimes a broken wrist.

While your child may just have a sprained wrist if he has fallen, it is important to make sure that it isn't actually broken instead. If your child can't move his hand or wrist, is in severe pain, has numbness, or the bone 'looks' broken, then see your pediatrician or go to the emergency room.

For a sprain, common first aid includes the basic RICE treatments, including:

  • Rest
  • Ice
  • Compression, ace bandage, etc.
  • Elevation

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Car Seats and Winter Coats

Car Seats and Winter Coats
First Aid and Safety Photos Car Seats and Winter Coats. Photo (c) Bradley Mason

During the winter, when many kids wear extra clothing, these extra layers can pose a 'hidden hazard' as you try to use your child's car seat correctly.

One of the basics of correct car seat installation, in addition to buckling the car seat tightly into your vehicle, is that your child is 'buckled snugly' into the car seat itself. If the harness straps are loose, then your child can be injured or could even fly out of the car seat if you are in a crash.

Remember that the American Academy of Pediatrics advises that "It's OK to adjust the straps to allow for thicker clothes, but make sure the harness still holds the child snugly. Also, remember to tighten the straps again after the thicker clothes are no longer needed."

Keep in mind that this will likely not apply to very thick and heavy winter coats with car seats, though, which may become compressed under the harness straps in a crash, become too loose, and may allow your child to become injured or even ejected from the seat and/or car.

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A Child with Stitches

A Child with Stitches
First Aid and Safety Photos A Child with Stitches. Photo (c) James Bowers

Stitches can help a wound heal faster and leave less of a scar.

Although some minor cuts heal on their own without stitches, it can be hard for parents to judge when they do or don't need to go get stitches when their child is cut.

In general, your child may need stitches if the wound:

  • won't stop bleeding after 10 minutes,
  • is longer than 1/2 inch, and/or
  • is gaping open

Because of the risk of scaring, when in doubt about whether or not a cut on the face needs stitches, you should usually have it evaluated by a doctor.

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Dog Bite Photo

A child ready for sugery to repair a dog bite.
First Aid and Safety Photos A child ready for sugery to repair a dog bite. Photo (c) Vincent Iannelli, MD

A photo of a child's nose after getting a bitten by a dog. She is ready for surgery.

This child was attacked by her neighbor's dog who got through their fence.

As many experts report, half of dog bites are from a dog that the child may be familiar with, either the family's own dog or that of a neighbor, as in this case.

In addition to basic first aid and cleaning the wound, your child may need antibiotics, a tetanus shot, and/or rabies vaccination after a dog bite. You should seek immediate medical attention for multiple or serious bites, especially in younger children and bites that involve your child's head and neck, such as this dog bite on this young girl's nose.

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Dog Bite After Surgery

Dog Bite After Surgery
First Aid and Safety Photos Dog Bite After Surgery. Photo (c) Vincent Iannelli, MD

A child's nose after her dog bite has been surgically repaired.

Keep in mind that most dog bites aren't sutured closed, because of this risk of infection. Bites on the face or those considered to be 'clean' or quickly seen by the doctor may be sutured at times.

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Dog Bite 'After' Picture

Dog Bite 'After' Picture
First Aid and Safety Photos Dog Bite 'After' Picture. Photo (c) Vincent Iannelli, MD

Dog Bite 'After' Picture. Surgery was a great success.

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Stair Safety

Stair Safety
First Aid and Safety Photos Stair Safety. Photo (c) Sean Warren

Securing the stairs in your home with gates, which seem to be missing in this photo, to prevent falls is another essential part of childproofing your home.

Having gates on stairs is an important way to childproof your home, especially if you have an infant, toddler, or preschooler in the house.

Gates should be installed on both the top and bottom of every staircase in your home.

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Ice Pack on a Sprained Knee

Ice Pack on a Sprained Knee
First Aid and Safety Photos Ice Pack on a Sprained Knee. Photo (c) Wendy Shiao

An ice pack can be helpful for many sport's injuries.

Although everyone wants kids to be more active, no one wants that increase in physical activity to come at the expense of more injuries. Unfortunately, many kids do get injured while playing sports. In fact, according to the National SAFE KIDS Campaign, 'each year, more than 3.5 million children ages 14 and under are treated for sports injuries.'

While your child may just have a sprained wrist, knee, or ankle if he has fallen, it is important to make sure that it isn't actually broken instead. If your child can't move his arm or leg, is in severe pain, has numbness, or the bone 'looks' broken, then see your pediatrician or go to the emergency room.

For a sprain, common first aid includes the basic RICE treatments, including:

  • Rest
  • Ice
  • Compression with an ace bandage, etc.
  • Elevation

It is also important that you teach your kids that they shouldn't play through their pain.

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Child Sleeping in a Car Seat

Child Sleeping in a Car Seat
First Aid and Safety Photos Child Sleeping in a Car Seat. Photo (c) Franky De Meyer

Although he seems comfortable, if the car is moving, the car seat isn't really providing any protection for this sleeping child if there is a car accident.

If this was a moving car and there was an accident, the child would either be ejected from the vehicle or have serious abdominal injuries because of where the shoulder strap is located.

Remember that your child's safety is always the most important thing to consider, whether you are on a long trip or just driving home from the store and your child's car seat doesn't provide full protection unless you use it correctly.

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Infant Choke Foods

Uncut spaghetti is a choke food
First Aid and Safety Photos Uncut spaghetti is a choke food. Photo (c) Michelle Milliman

Although parents often remember common 'choke foods,' like hot dogs, peanuts, and hard candy, they forget that young kids can choke on uncut spaghetti.

In addition to uncut spaghetti and hard or gooey candy, other common choke foods for infants and toddlers include:

  • hot dogs
  • hard candy
  • peanuts/nuts
  • seeds
  • whole grapes
  • raw carrots
  • apples
  • popcorn
  • chunks of peanut butter (if your toddler isn't at risk for food allergies and you decide to give him peanut butter, spread smooth peanut butter thinly on bread or a cracker)
  • marshmallows
  • chewing gum
  • meat sticks/sausages
  • chunks of cheese

The American Academy of Pediatrics warns that certain foods are a choking hazard for kids under age four unless it is chopped completely (which isn't practical or possible for some foods, like popcorn, nuts, or chewing gum).

Sources:

AAP Policy Statement. Prevention of Choking Among Children. PEDIATRICS Vol. 125 No. 3 March 2010, pp. 601-607.

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Electrical Outlet Safety

Electrical Outlet Safety
First Aid and Safety Photos Electrical Outlet Safety. Photo (c) Rick Hinson

This photo of an electric outlet with a pair of scissors and paint brush in it offers a good example of how your child views your home.

If you want to truly childproof your home, it is best to get on all fours, at your child's level and think like your child.

In addition to common safety measures, like putting latches on cabinets, covers on doorknobs, and gates on stairs, thinking like your child will help you find hidden dangers in your home.

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Mesh Pool Fence

Mesh Pool Fence
First Aid and Safety Photos Mesh Pool Fence. Photo (c) Jerry Schiller

Mesh pool fences are becoming a popular alternative to more traditional permanent pool fences become they are less expensive and are removable.

Although newer mesh pool fences are becoming even more attractive because they can include self-closing and self-latching gates, they remain a second-best option for most families because they are removable.

Unless you truly use your removable mesh pool fence like a permanent pool fence and never take it down, not even at parties, then you will always be removing one layer of protection around your pool, which could put your child's safety at risk.

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Removable Pool Fence

A mesh pool fence partially removed at a party.
First Aid and Safety A mesh pool fence partially removed at a party. Photo (c) Vincent Iannelli, MD

A mesh pool fence partially removed at a party.

Even when they have the best of intentions, people who have a removable mesh pool fence often take them down, especially when they have a party.

This removes one of the layers of protection around your pool, especially if the party moves inside, you forget to put the mesh pool fence back up completely, and a young child gets out of the house and into the pool.

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Removable Mesh Pool Fence

Removable Mesh Pool Fence
First Aid and Safety Photos Removable Mesh Pool Fence. Photo (c) Vincent Iannelli, MD

A permanent pool fence, unlike this partially removed mesh fence, can be a good part of your layers of protection plan around your pool.

These twins are wearing flotation devices and are being supervised, but once they get out of the pool and get changed, the partially removed mesh pool fence won't keep them from getting back into the pool...

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Breakdown in Pool Safety

Breakdown in Pool Safety
First Aid and Safety Photos Breakdown in Pool Safety. Photo (c) Vincent Iannelli, MD

The 'layers of protection' has broken down around this pool, as the removable mesh pool fence has been partially taken down at this pool party, people are drinking, and kids may get into the pool without proper supervision.

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A Child with a Scraped Knee

A Child with a Scraped Knee
First Aid and Safety Photos A Child with a Scraped Knee. Photo (c) Suzanne Tucker

All parents would benefit from learning basic first aid on how to treat a scraped knee.

A scraped knee might look like a minor injury, but it can be painful and may seem like major trauma to your child, depending on how sensitive he is.

Like other minor wounds, when treating a scraped knee, you should first stop any bleeding by applying pressure to the wound with a bandage or clean cloth. Next, rinse the wound with water and wash the area around the wound with soap and water. Try to remove any dirt, rocks, or other debris from the wound.

Lastly, apply an antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover it with a bandaid or other dressing.

If the wound can't easily be cleaned or begins to show signs of infection, such as redness, swelling, or drainage, then be sure to see your pediatrician.

What about hydrogen peroxide? Remember that experts no longer recommend that you apply hydrogen peroxide to a wound anymore, as it is now believed that it can actually delay healing.

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Healing Scab on a Child's Knee

Healing Scab on a Child's Knee
First Aid and Safety Photos Healing Scab on a Child's Knee. Photo (c) Carmen Martínez Banús

A healing scab on a child's scraped knee.

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Healing Scab with a Bandaid

Healing Scab with a Bandaid
First Aid and Safety Photos Healing Scab with a Bandaid. Photo (c) Carmen Martínez Banús

A child with a healing scab on her scraped knee.

With a scraped knee or other wound, it is important to remind your child to not remove the scab.

Removing the scab will only delay the healing process and may make it more likely that your child develops a scar.

A bandaid over the wound, in addition to protecting it from getting dirty, may help keep your child from 'playing' with the wound and picking the scab off.

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Safe Rollerblading

Safe Rollerblading
First Aid and Safety Photos Safe Rollerblading. Photo (c) Brent Deuel

Remember that a helmet, wrist guards, knee pads, and elbow pads, are not just for beginner rollerbladers.

Whether riding rollerblades, skateboard, or scooter, kids should always wear proper safety equipment, including a helmet, knee pads, and elbow pads. Wrist guards should also be used when skateboarding and rollerblading, but may make it difficult to grip the handles of a scooter.

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Safe Swimming With Floaties?

Safe Swimming With Floaties?
First Aid and Safety Photos Safe Swimming With Floaties?. Photo (c) Peggy De Meue

Most experts consider floaties or inflatable arm bands to be toys and not proper pool safety equipment.

A Coast Guard approved life vest or life jacket is a safer option than floaties or inflatable arm bands for your child in the pool.

Other commonly used flotation devices that are not considered to be safe enough to protect younger kids in the water include:

  • inflatable tubes
  • air mattresses
  • rafts
  • inflatable seats and riders for baby's and toddlers
  • swim rings
  • wave surf boards
  • noodles

While these flotation devices can be fun in the water, if your child doesn't know how to swim, be sure to also use a Coast Guard approved life vest or life jacket at the same time. And stay within arms reach when your younger child is in the water.

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No Booster Seat

Even Superheroes Need Booster Seats!
First Aid and Safety Photos Even Superheroes Need Booster Seats!. Photo by Vincent Iannelli, MD

Even superheroes need booster seats!

According to the latest car seat guidelines, kids should move to a belt-positioning booster seat when they reach the weight and height harness strap limits of their forward-facing car seat. The move to regular seat belts should not occur until kids are "old enough and large enough" for the seat belts to protect them properly, which usually isn't until they are 4 feet 9 inches tall (57 inches) and are between 8 and 12 years old.

Signs that seat belts fit your child include that the shoulder belt fits across your child's shoulder, and does not go on his neck and you don't have to put it behind him. Also, the lap belt should fit low on his hips and not on his abdomen.

If your child has outgrown his forward-facing car seat, keep him in a booster seat until he really is ready for regular seat belts.

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First Aid for a Scraped Knee

First Aid for a Scraped Knee
First Aid and Safety Photos First Aid for a Scraped Knee. Photo (c) Carmen Martínez Banús

Like other minor wounds, when treating a scraped knee, you should first stop any bleeding by applying pressure to the wound with a bandage or clean cloth.

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Electrical Cord Safety

Electrical Cord Safety
First Aid and Safety Photos Electrical Cord Safety. Photo (c) Marilyn Nieves

When childproofing, don't forget electrical cords and other hidden dangers.

In addition to pulling this electrical cord out of the outlet and then putting something else into the outlet and getting a shock, your child could pull on the other end and have a heavy appliance fall on him.

Be sure to keep electrical cords out of reach of your children when childproofing your home.

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Kids Crossing the Street

Kids Crossing the Street
First Aid and Safety Photos Kids Crossing the Street. Photo (c) Jeffrey Zavitski

Kids often cross the street in the middle of the block, where it isn't safe, so it is important to teach them traffic safety.

To help avoid accidents, it is important to teach younger kids to cross the street with supervision and to only cross at an intersection with a crosswalk or traffic signal.

In addition, it is very important that your kids always look for traffic by looking left, right, left, and over their shoulder for traffic, and then continue to look while crossing the street.

You should also teach your kids to:

  • avoid wearing headphones and listening to music while walking or biking, which can interfere with their hearing cars honking or a train's horn
  • wear reflective materials if they will be out early in the morning or after the sun has gone down so as to increase nighttime visibility
  • always walk on the sidewalk, but if they must walk in the street, then walk facing traffic
  • walk or ride with a buddy or in groups

Most importantly, train your kids so that they don't assume that cars will stop for them and always wait for cars to stop before entering an intersection and crossing the street.

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An Infant in a Car Seat

An Infant in a Car Seat
First Aid and Safety Photos An Infant in a Car Seat. Photo (c) Brian McEntire

An infant smiling as he gets buckled into his car seat.

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Harness Clip in Good Position

Harness Clips in Good Position
First Aid and Safety Photos Harness Clips in Good Position. Photo (c) Wendy Shiao

The harness clip or chest clip holds the shoulder straps in place.

Since having the harness clip in the wrong position is a common car seat mistake, this photo of a child in a car seat with the harness clip at the mid-chest, armpit level, is a good reminder of how to correctly install your child's car seat.

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Car Seat Nap

Car Seat Nap
First Aid and Safety Photos Car Seat Nap. Photo (c) J Kullander

There is nothing wrong with letting your child nap in his car seat, just as long as he is safely and snugly strapped in.

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Sleeping in a Car Seat Safely?

Sleeping in a Car Seat Safely?
First Aid and Safety Photos Sleeping in a Car Seat Safely?. Photo (c) Matthew Pullicino

Is this child sleeping in his car seat safely?

Not without the harness clip that should always be used with a car seat that has a five point harness, whether or not a child is asleep. A missing harness clip or having it in the wrong position is a common car seat mistake.

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