7 Fiber Supplements For Gluten-Free Diets

Learn which ones might be safe for you

Which fiber supplements are gluten-free?. Jane M. Anderson

The average American gets only about half of the recommended 20 to 35 grams of fiber per day. This may be especially true for people following a gluten-free diet, since one of the best sources of fiber, whole grain wheat and products made from wheat, contains gluten. 

For those folks, supplements may be the answer to filling in the fiber gaps created by avoiding wheat and other high-fiber sources of gluten.

It's not a good idea to rely solely on supplements, but taking them will bring you a bit closer to getting the necessary amount, so you won't have to scramble to fit in the rest.

Safe Fiber Supplements For a Gluten-Free Diet

For any food or supplement to legally be considered gluten-free, it must contain fewer than 20 parts per million of gluten. Note however that several popular fiber supplements may contain trace gluten (below legal gluten-free limits) even if they are labeled gluten-free. And one popular fiber supplement is made from wheateven though it's legally labeled gluten-free.

  • Benefiber. This fiber supplement comes in powder form. The primary ingredient in Benefiber is wheat dextrin, but because this is a portion of the wheat plant that doesn't contain the protein that creates problems for people with celiac disease and other problems, it's legally labeled as being gluten-free. There are 3 grams of soluble dietary fiber in 3 teaspoons of Benefiber. 
  • Citrucel. All Citrucel products—orange-flavored powders for mixing into liquid and caplets—are gluten-free. They're made from a form of soluble fiber from plants and do not contain any wheat, barley, or rye-based ingredients. Citrucel powders contain 2 grams of fiber per dose; the caplets contain half a gram of fiber each.
  • Fiber-Con. The active ingredient in FiberCon is calcium polycarbophil, an over-the-counter drug that treats constipation by causing stool to absorb water. Although FiberCon is not derived from gluten grains and is made in a gluten-free facility, the final product isn't tested for gluten be, so it isn't labeled as gluten-free. 
  • Fiber Choice. Available in multiple flavors (some of which offer added vitamins and minerals), Fiber Choice chewable tablets get their fiber from a type of vegetable fiber called inulin. All flavors of Fiber Choice chewable wafers are considered gluten-free. The same is true of gummies made by the same company, Fiber Choice Fruity Bites.
  • Fiber Well Gummies. Two of these chewable fiber supplements provide 5 grams of soluble fiber sourced from polydextrose. They also contain added B vitamins. They are labeled as being free of gluten and are processed in a wheat-free facility that also processes egg, fish, shellfish, soy, and tree nut products.
  • Metamucil. Made from psyllium husk, Metamucil may be the best-known brand of fiber supplement available in the U.S. It comes in powder, capsules, health bars, and wafers. Two teaspoons of original coarse powder Metamucil contains 6 grams of fiber, 5 grams of which are soluble fiber. All Metamucil powders and capsules are gluten-free but may contain trace gluten, according to the packaging. Meta Fiber Wafers are made with wheat flour.
  • NOW Foods Psyllium. The labels on all versions of this supplement state that they're "free of wheat and gluten." NOW is available in flavored and unflavored powder forms and as capsules. One tablespoon of the powder offers 6 grams of soluble fiber plus 1 gram of non-soluble fiber. There is 1 gram of fiber per three capsules. ​

 

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