Hawaiian Tuna Poke Bowl

poke bowl
Kaleigh McMordie, MCN, RDN, LD
Total Time 30 min
Prep 30 min, Cook 0 min
Yield 2 servings (399 calories each)

Poke (pronounced “PAH-KAY”) is a traditional Hawaiian dish made with raw fish and served over warm steamed rice. Poke means “to cut or slice” and that’s exactly what you do—cube fresh, sushi-grade fish into cubes, marinate them in a simple savory sauce, and serve in a bowl with rice and lots of toppings.

This poke bowl recipe is a way to get a sushi-like meal at home with no rolling required. It uses steamed whole grain brown rice, fresh yellowfin (or ahi) tuna, and fresh veggies—quick-pickled carrots, creamy avocado, radishes, and cilantro. A sprinkle of sesame seeds tops off the bowl.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup carrots, shredded
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon fresh ginger paste
  • 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
  • 8 ounces sushi grade yellowfin (ahi) tuna
  • 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons minced shallot
  • 3 stalks green onion, chopped
  • 1 1/2 cup steamed brown rice
  • 2 radishes, very thinly sliced
  • 1/2 small avocado, thinly sliced
  • fresh cilantro
  • sesame seeds

Preparation

  1. Place carrots in a jar. Whisk together sugar, ginger, and vinegar and add to carrots. Shake and refrigerate one hour to quick pickle carrots.
  2. Using a sharp knife, cut tuna neatly into 1/2-inch cubes. Place in a non-reactive bowl.

  3. Add soy sauce, sesame oil, shallot, and green onion and stir to combine. Refrigerate while you prepare other ingredients.

  4. Divide rice between two bowls. Scoop tuna on top and garnish with carrots, radishes, and avocado. Sprinkle with cilantro and sesame seeds and serve.

    Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

    Feel free to make it your own with whatever fresh vegetables you have on hand, and if you prefer a little spice, add some wasabi or sriracha. You can also use sushi-grade salmon instead of tuna if you would like.

    Cooking and Serving Tips

    Don’t be intimidated by the raw fish. Just ask your butcher for sushi-grade tuna to ensure it is safe to eat raw, then keep it cold until ready to use. Then use a very sharp knife to cut it into clean, half-inch cubes.

    Use quick-cooking brown rice instead of traditional if you’re short on time.

    This dish is best served immediately after it is made.

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