Home Temperature for a New Baby

New Baby Tips

A crying baby
Don't let your baby get overheated, which could make him fussy and can be a risk factor for SIDS. Photo by Johanna Goodyear

New parents often have a lot of questions about new babies and their temperature.

But after the questions about the correct way to take their temperature and recognizing if they have a fever, a very common question is about the right temperature to keep their home at to keep their baby safe and comfortable.

Best Home Temperature for a New Baby

Since getting overheated is a risk factor for SIDS and a baby that gets too cold will likely get fussy, have trouble sleeping, and may have other medical problems, the temperature of your home is important to think about when you bring your new baby home.

In general, most experts recommend that you:

  • keep your home at a 'comfortable' temperature of between 68 to 72 degrees Fahrenheit
  • don't over-bundle your baby, but instead consider dressing her with one extra layer than you are wearing yourself
  • check you baby for overheating, including sweating or your baby's chest feeling hot

The 68 to 72 degrees Fahrenheit temperature is likely more for the wintertime when you have the heat on, as that would typically be a little cold in the summer when you have the air-conditioner on. A temperature of 75 to 78 would be more sensible in the summer and more environmentally friendly.

Keep in mind that the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that 'the infant should be lightly clothed for sleep, and the bedroom temperature should be kept comfortable for a lightly clothed adult. Over-bundling should be avoided, and the infant should not feel hot to the touch.'

What To Know About the Best Home Temperature for a New Baby

In addition to these tips, other things to know about the temperature that you should likely keep your home at include:

  • avoid placing your unattended baby near a space heater, as she can quickly get overheated
  • never place a sleeping baby near a space heater
  • there is no evidence that using a fan will reduce your baby's risk of SIDS
  • keep blankets, quilts, and comforters out of your child's crib

Keep in mind that the AAP states that "it is difficult to provide specific room- temperature guidelines for avoiding overheating." Instead, remember to keep your home at a comfortable temperature, dress your baby appropriately, and check her for overheating.


AAP Policy Statement. The SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Deaths: Expansion of Recommendations for a Safe Infant Sleeping Environment. Pediatrics 2011;128:1030–1039

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