How the Family Deductible Works in a High Deductible Health Plan

The Family Deductible Works Differently with an HDHP Than With Other Plan Types

167644157-Paul-Bradbury-GettyImages.jpg
An HDHP can cover your whole family, but the deductible works a bit differently than you're used to. Image ©Paul Bradbury/Getty Images

If your family’s health insurance is a high-deductible health plan, your family deductible may work differently than it did when you had other health insurance. If you don’t understand exactly how the family deductible works in an HDHP, you could be surprised. Your health insurance might not start paying benefits when you think it will, or one family member may have to pay more than you anticipate before coverage begins.

If you’re not quite clear on the basics of what a deductible is, what’s credited toward it, and what happens after you’ve paid your deductible, read “Health Insurance Deductible—What It Is and How It Works” before you go any further. You’ll need this basic understanding of deductibles before you’ll be able to understand how an HDHP’s family deductible differs from the norm.

How a Family Deductible Works in a High Deductible Health Plan

With family coverage in an HDHP, health plan benefits don’t begin for any member of the family until the entire family deductible has been paid. As each family member incurs medical expenses, the amount they pay toward these expenses is credited toward the family’s deductible. When these expenses add up to the family deductible, the HDHP coverage kicks in and starts paying its share of the cost of health care expenses for each member of the family.

In an HDHP, the family deductible can be met by in two different ways:

  1. One family member has high health care expenses. By paying those health care expenses, he reaches the family deductible and coverage kicks in for the entire family.
  2. Several different family members have smaller health care expenses. The family deductible is met when these smaller expenses added together reach the family deductible amount.

    How Is That Different Than the Family Deductible in a Non-HDHP Plan?

    In a more traditional type of health plan, each family member has an individual deductible and the family as a whole has a family deductible. Everything paid toward individual deductibles is also credited toward the family deductible.

    There are two ways these non-HDHP health plans will begin to pay benefits for a particular individual within the family.

    1. If an individual meets his or her individual deductible, the health plan benefits kick-in and begin to pay the health care expenses for that individual only, but not for the other family members.
    2. If the family deductible is met, health plan benefits kick-in for every member of the family whether or not they’ve met their own individual deductibles.

    You can learn more about how a family deductible works in non-HDHP plans in “How a Family Deductible Works.”

    The difference between the traditional type of health insurance deductible system and the family deductible in an HDHP health plan is that the individual deductible is eliminated in family HDHP coverage.

    There is only one way the HDHP health plan will begin to pay benefits for any family member: the family deductible has been met.

    In contrast, with a non-HDHP plan, the family deductible can’t be met by the health care expenses of one family member alone. It takes the added deductibles of several family members together to reach the family deductible.

    How Do You Know Which Way Your Family Deductible Works?

    Most HDHPs use the family deductible system in which there are no individual deductibles and nobody in the family gets benefits until the family deductible has been met. This is known as an aggregate deductible.

    Most non-HDHP health plans use the system where benefits begin for individuals who meet their individual deductible before the family deductible has been met. This is known as an embedded deductible. You can remember this term if you think of it as several individual deductibles embedded within the larger family deductible.

    Your health plan’s literature should tell you how your family deductible works. It may use examples, or it may use the terms aggregate deductible vs embedded deductible. If it’s not clear, call the health plan and ask or, if it’s job-based health insurance, check with your employee benefits department.

    If your HDHP Summary of Benefits and Coverage lists both a single deductible amount and a family deductible amount, don’t just assume it uses an embedded deductible system. The single deductible could be for individuals who aren’t enrolling an entire family rather than for individuals within a family policy.

    Which Is Better, an Aggregate Deductible or an Embedded Deductible?

    As a general rule, embedded deductibles tend to save families on out-of-pocket costs since health coverage kicks-in for some family members before the entire family deductible has been met. This results in the sickest family members having their health insurance benefits kick-in sooner with an embedded family deductible than they would have kicked-in using the HDHP method of an aggregate family deductible.

    However, how each family’s individual members use health care services is unique. Judge which system works better for your family based on your family’s health insurance usage patterns.

    Beware—Not All High-Deductible Plans Are HDHPs

    Don’t assume that, since you have a high deductible, you must have a high-deductible health plan. An HDHP is a specific type of health insurance, not just any old plan with a really big deductible. Since HDHPs may qualify you to participate in a tax-favored Health Savings Account or Health Reimbursement Arrangement, they have other special rules that set them apart from non-HDHP plans. Although you might have an HDHP PPO or an HDHP EPO, it will still follow all of the special regulations that make it an HDHP, not just the big deductible.

    If your plan is really an HDHP, your health plan literature should refer to it as an HDHP or a high deductible health plan. Additionally, it may make reference to combining your health insurance with an HSA.

    Catastrophic Health Coverage Vs HDHPNot the Same Thing Anymore

    Update

    The Department of Health & Human Services has tweaked the rules slightly for ​non-grandfathered health plans using an aggregate deductible. This affects most family HDHP health plans. The added wrinkle is this: a health plan can't require any individual to pay a deductible that is higher than the federal limit for the out-of-pocket maximum for individual coverage, even if that person is covered under an aggregate family deductible. For 2016, the out-of-pocket maximum for an individual is limited to $6,850.

    An Example: Let's say the aggregate deductible for your 2016 family plan is $12,000. Once any individual family member has paid $6,850 toward the aggregate deductible amount, coverage for that particular individual must kick in without requiring further cost-sharing like copays or coinsurance. This person's coverage kicks in because he or she has now reached the legal out-of-pocket limit for an individual. However, coverage for the other members of your family still won't kick in until the family's entire aggregate deductible has been met.

    This adjustment to the rules takes place as soon as your health insurance plan renews in 2016. Until then, your health plan will likely follow the older rules. The government raises the upper limit on out-of-pocket maximums slightly each year to account for inflation.

    Continue Reading