How To Calm a Teen's Fears About Starting High School

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Young teens look at starting high school with a great deal of awe. Your teen will experience some excitement, but there will be some fears mixed in. You can help calm your teen’s fears by following these tips.

Difficulty: Average

Time Required: N/A

Here's How:

  1. Develop the routine. How is your teen getting to school? When will he/she be coming home and what will he/she do for lunch? What other simple concerns does your teen have? When we develop a routine, we answer everyday concerns so that we don’t need to worry about them. Worrying about little things makes it harder for us to focus on bigger problems, like dealing with difficult teachers. So help your teen establish a routine and get the answers to his/her simple concerns.
  1. Be ready for the expected and unexpected. First, let’s tackle the expected. There is going to be problems with classes, hard homework and busy schedules. Take a good look at what your teen is going to be doing this coming school year and expect these things. As for the unexpected, be prepared by knowing how to talk to your teen. It is always the best prevention and defense.
  2. Take time away. Don’t spend the entire summer working on starting high school. Don’t make it the topic of conversation with each family visit. Your teen will need a break from it.
  3. Give your teen time with friends who are attending the same school. There is not only safety in numbers but a feeling of safety in numbers. Teens who are disconnected with their peers over the summer tend to be a little more fearful with the school year starts.
  4. Talk to your teen about the specifics of his/her fears. Address them through role-play and talking to others that can help. If need be, call the school to see when the guidance office is available to talk to you and your teen.

    Tips:

    1. Know that a little bit of fear and stress is normal and helpful in experiencing new things. Remind your teen that bravery isn’t the absence of fear, it’s acting the way you should even though you are fearful.
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