How to Give a Condom Blowjob

Making Fellatio Safe

Loving gay couple about to kiss in the living room.
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Oral sex isn't safe sex. Blow jobs put both the giver and the receiver at risk of numerous STDs. Fortunately for everyone who enjoys fellatio, there are ways to make the act safer. Using a condom for oral sex won't make your blowjobs less fun. Condoms will, however, make "BJs" less likely to be something you'll regret.

Here's how:

  1. Choose the right blowjob condom. In general, you'll want to avoid lubricated condoms. In particular, avoid those lubricated with nonoxynol-9. Lubricant can taste unpleasant. Nonoxynol-9 can also make your tongue go numb. 
  1.  Using whatever techniques that may be at your disposal (kissing, touching, etc.), arouse your partner. The goal is to get his penis to be at least semi-erect. You can not put a condom on a flaccid penis. 
  2. Put the condom on your partner's penis. You can do this with either your hands or, with a little bit of practice, your mouth
  3. Give your partner a blowjob, as you normally would. Just remember that the body parts that are not latex-covered could still, at least theoretically, transmit STDs. In particular, they could transmit any sexually transmitted diseases that are passed from skin to skin. Such conditions include genital herpes and syphilis.
  4. When one or both of you is done with the blow job, carefully remove the condom and discard it. It's a good idea to use a new condom for any other form of sex. That's particularly true if you have used lubricants containing sugar or flavored condoms. Not all such products are suitable for penetration. 

    Tips to Keep in Mind

    1. Remember that if you have oral herpes you can transmit it to your partner's genitals. In fact, HSV-1 may be even more contagious than HSV-2. Studies suggest that over half of genital herpes cases are now caused by the virus previously thought of as the "oral herpes" virus. 
    2. If you have been fondling your partner, it is a good idea to wash your hands before touching yourself. The data is not conclusive. However, it seems likely that fingering can transmit at least some STDs.
    1. Condoms are more effective at preventing those STDs that are transmitted via bodily fluids than those that are passed from skin to skin. Therefore, using a condom during oral sex is more certain to protect both partners from HIV than herpes. Still, even in the case of skin transmitted STDs, using a condom during oral sex will reduce disease risk.
    2. Some flavored condoms sold for oral sex are actually novelty items. Make sure any condoms you buy are made from latex or polyurethane. They should also be labeled as being FDA-approved for use against unplanned pregnancies and STDs.
    3. You may like using food to spice up your oral sex life. However, make sure not to use any foods that are oil-based. They can degrade latex condoms.
    4. It's also important to use barriers when performing oral sex on a woman. You can use a condom that has been cut open to form a dental dam. You can also make a dental dam out of a latex glove

    Sources:

    Committee on Adolescent Health Care.; Committee on Gynecologic Practice. Committee Opinion No. 582: addressing health risks of noncoital sexual activity. Obstet Gynecol. 2013 Dec;122(6):1378-82. doi: 10.1097/01.AOG.0000438963.23732.80.

    Nieuwenhuis RF, van Doornum GJ, Mulder PG, Neumann HA, van der Meijden WI. Importance of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) in primary genital herpes. Acta Derm Venereol. 2006;86(2):129-34.

    Wong ML, Chan R, Koh D. Long-term effects of condom promotion programmes for vaginal and oral sex on sexually transmitted infections among sex workers in Singapore. AIDS. 2004 May 21;18(8):1195-9.

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