Knee Pain Exercises

1
Push Step

Paige Waehner

If you have knee pain, whether it's from an injury, osteoarthritis or other condition, you should see your doctor to make sure it's okay to try this or any other exercise. If you've gotten clearance for exercise and you're dealing with knee pain, one proven approach is to strength the muscles that support your knees - the quads, hamstrings, inner and outer thigh muscles. This push step is a great way to warm up and strengthen the quads, but skip it if you feel any pain in the knees.

  1. Stand with your left side to a step, platform or the bottom step of a staircase.
  2. Place the left foot on the step and push up a few inches on the left leg.
  3. Your right foot should come off the floor just a few inches and you should feel the front of your thigh engage. It's almost like stepping up halfway instead of stepping all the way up.
  4. Come back down and repeat the push step, moving at a faster pace as you become more comfortable with the movement.
  5. Repeat for 30-60 seconds on the left leg and switch to the right for 1-3 sets.

2
Hamstring Curl

Paige Waehner

If you have knee pain, whether it's from an injury, osteoarthritis or other condition, you should see your doctor to make sure it's okay to try this or any other exercise. If you've gotten clearance for exercise and you're dealing with knee pain, one proven approach is to strength the muscles that support your knees - the quads, hamstrings, inner and outer thigh muscles. This hamstring curl is a great way to strengthen the back of the legs, but avoid this exercise if it causes pain or discomfort.

  1. Tie a resistance band around your ankles (optional), leaving enough tension so that the band is tight when feet are about a foot apart.
  2. Stand in front of a chair and hold onto it for balance if you need to, keeping the band under the left foot to keep it from moving.
  3. Bend your right knee, bringing your foot up behind you (like you're kicking your own butt).
  4. Keep the right knee pointing straight down towards the floor and only bend the knee as far as you comfortably can.
  5. Lower and repeat for 1-3 sets of 12 reps on each side.
  6. You can also use ankle weights instead of a resistance band.

3
Knee Lifts

Paige Waehner

If you have knee pain, whether it's from an injury, osteoarthritis or other condition, you should see your doctor to make sure it's okay to try this or any other exercise. If you've gotten clearance for exercise and you're dealing with knee pain, one proven approach is to strength the muscles that support your knees - the quads, hamstrings, inner and outer thigh muscles. This knee lift is a great way to strengthen the quads and hip flexors in the front of the leg while working on your balance and stability. Avoid this exercise if it causes pain or discomfort.

  1. Loop a resistance band around your ankles (optional), leaving enough space so that the band is tight when feet are spread about a foot apart. Keep the band looped under the bottom of the standing foot.
  2. Stand next to a chair or wall for balance, if needed, and stand up tall, keeping the abs engaged.
  3. Lift the right knee up until it's level with the hip (or as high as you can).
  4. Lower and repeat for 1-3 sets of 12 reps on each leg.
  5. You can substitute ankle weights if you don't have a resistance band.

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