Light and Fluffy Coconutty Quinoa Breakfast

Low-FODMAP Quinoa Breakfast
Leyla Shamayeva, MS, RD
Total Time 23 min
Prep 3 min, Cook 20 min
Yield 1

Cereals (even the healthy ones!) are often wheat-based, as are breads, bagels, and pastries. It's no surprise that you might feel limited with breakfast options if you're following a low-FODMAP diet. And while oats and omelettes are safe bets, you can enjoy them only so many times before you get bored.

Vary your breakfast options with quinoa, which is a bit higher than oats in both protein and fiber. This recipe features the seed cooked in almond milk, which provides a nutty flavor but doesn't trigger IBS symptoms like lactose-rich cow's milk would. We're also incorporating a few fructan-balanced fruits for natural sweetness. Best part? This recipe is perfect for on-the-go.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup quinoa
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 medium banana, ½ mashed and ½ sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 tablespoon ground flaxseed
  • 1/4 cup blueberries
  • 1 tablespoon unsweetened coconut flakes

Preparation

1. Rinse the quinoa if the brand you are using doesn't pre-rinse it for you. This will get rid of the saponins, which yield a soapy, bitter taste.

2. Heat a small saute pan over medium heat. Add the wet quinoa and toast for 3-4 minutes, stirring so that it doesn't burn, until you begin to smell a nutty flavor.

3. Add the almond milk and cook on low heat, covered, for about 15-20 minutes, until most of the almond milk is absorbed.

Transfer to a bowl, fluff, and let cool slightly.

4. Stir in the mashed banana, vanilla extract, ground flaxseed, and salt.

5. Top with blueberries, sliced banana, and coconut flakes.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

Almond milk is low-FODMAP friendly in serving sizes of up to one cup, so it works well in this recipe. Make sure to use the unsweetened variety as some brands may use high-FODMAP sweeteners.

Regular cow's milk is higher in lactose and likely to trigger symptoms—a single cup provides up to 16 grams of lactose, while most people can tolerate up to 4 grams in one sitting. If you're past the reintroduction phase of the low-FODMAP diet and know that you can tolerate cow's milk, feel free to swap it in.

Note that you could also use soy milk if it is made from soybean protein. Varieties made from whole soybeans provide large amounts of fructans, making them a high-FODMAP food, so check the ingredient label before you buy and use.

Bananas and blueberries are smart choices for natural sweetness here because they don't provide the excess fructose that often triggers IBS symptoms—they are balanced in glucose and fructose. They also don't provide large amounts of sorbitol, a polyol (sugar alcohol) also shown to trigger symptoms. Many fruits that seem like a good swap here have these—apples, apricots, pears, blackberries, peaches, plums, cherries, and mangos, for example.

If you want to swap out the fruit, strawberries, raspberries, 1/4 cup pomegranate arils, pineapple, kiwi, oranges, and grapes are a safe bet. Keep your portions reasonable though—although these options are balanced in fructose and glucose, you can still overload on glucose if you eat too much, triggering symptoms.

Cooking and Serving Tips

If you do decide to use regular cow's milk, make sure to keep an eye on the quinoa as the milk is likely to run and overflow.

This dish is delicious served hot or cold. Pack it into a mason jar for a quick grab-and-go breakfast.

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