Liver Resection and Colon Resection at the Same Time?

Should You Opt for One Surgery or Two?

If you're going to have surgery for stage 4 colon cancer that has spread to the liver, you have a decision to make. Should you get a surgical resection of your colon first, give your body a chance to recover a bit, and then have a liver resection? Or should you knock out both resections with one surgery?

According to a study published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology, the short-term results were similar for patients regardless of which method they chose.

People who opted for separate surgeries spent fewer days in the hospital and required fewer blood transfusions. But, people who opted for the two-in-one deal had fewer post-operative complications and fewer complications overall. The researchers stressed that the topic is controversial among doctors and the two-in-one procedure is only safe for select patients.

What Can You Do With This Information?

Use this study as a topic of discussion with your oncologist. If the idea of one big surgery instead of two smaller ones appeals to you, simply ask your doctor if he thinks it's a good idea. And remember, always ask for an explanation and if your doctor is dismissive, feel free to seek a second opinion. You have the right to actively participate in your care, and that includes exploring all of your treatment options.

Related Research Summaries:

  • Progress in Individualized Chemotherapy

Source: Capussotti, L. and Ferrero, A. Major Liver Resections Synchronous with Colorectal Surgery." Annals of Surgical Oncology 14.1 (Jan. 2007): 195-201. SpringerLink. Accessed 15 Feb. 2007.

Should You Opt for One Surgery or Two?

If you're going to have surgery for stage 4 colon cancer that has spread to the liver, you have a decision to make.

Should you get a surgical resection of your colon first, give your body a chance to recover a bit, and then have a liver resection? Or should you knock out both resections with one surgery?

According to a study published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology, the short-term results were similar for patients regardless of which method they chose. People who opted for separate surgeries spent fewer days in the hospital and required fewer blood transfusions. But, people who opted for the two-in-one deal had fewer post-operative complications and fewer complications overall. The researchers stressed that the topic is controversial among doctors and the two-in-one procedure is only safe for select patients.

What Can You Do With This Information?

Use this study as a topic of discussion with your oncologist. If the idea of one big surgery instead of two smaller ones appeals to you, simply ask your doctor if he thinks it's a good idea. And remember, always ask for an explanation and if your doctor is dismissive, feel free to seek a second opinion.

You have the right to actively participate in your care, and that includes exploring all of your treatment options.

Related Research Summaries:

Source: Capussotti, L. and Ferrero, A. Major Liver Resections Synchronous with Colorectal Surgery." Annals of Surgical Oncology 14.1 (Jan. 2007): 195-201. SpringerLink. Accessed 15 Feb. 2007.

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