Measles Pictures

About the Very Serious & Easily-Prevented Infection

1
Measles Rash on Body

Photos of the Very Serious & Easily-Prevented Infection. Photo © 2009 NMSB - Custom Medical Stock Photo

Measles, also known as rubeola, is a highly contagious, deadly viral infection that affects people around the world. It's very serious for small children, but can be prevented with the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine. Even though an effective vaccine is available and widely used, it continues to occur even in developed countries. This image gallery explains how the measles spreads, as well as characteristics of measles symptoms and rashes.

This photo shows what the rash looks like on the body. Measles is an extremely contagious viral infection that is still present not only in the United States, but around the world, mostly in underdeveloped countries. A vaccine for the deadly infection was developed in 1963 and the number of cases in the United States has dropped dramatically since.

Measles very easily spread via respiratory droplets, like sneezes. It only takes a minuscule amount of respiratory droplets to cause an infection. When someone who has not be immunized against measles comes in contact with the virus, the virus will spread from the nose and respiratory tract to the lymph nodes. Then it will enter the bloodstream and infect organs like the skin, kidneys and liver.

The immune system responds by making antibodies to fight off the infection, but because the immune system is busy fighting the measles virus, it's less effective at fighting off other infections, making the person susceptible to even more illness.

2
Measles on Face

Photos of the Very Serious & Easily-Prevented Infection. Photo © 2009 NMSB - Custom Medical Stock Photo

After the virus enters the body, it incubates for 10 to 14 days before symptoms appear. Measles symptoms are similar to those of influenza: cough, runny nose, inflamed eyes, sore throat, fever and a red, blotchy rash. This is when the person is most contagious.

In this photo the rash appears on the boy's face. The measles rash most often begins on the face, usually around the hairline and forehead. It starts out with red, sponge-like bumps that soon join together to form several large bumps, which can be seen in the middle of the boy's cheek. The rash then moves down the rest of the body.

3
Koplik Spots

Photos of the Very Serious & Easily-Prevented Infection. Photo © 2009 O.J. Staats MD - Custom Medical Stock Photo

Measles symptoms are very similar to influenza symptoms. To tell the difference between the two viral infections, look in the mouth. After two days with symptoms, a person with measles will develop Koplik spots on the inside of their mouth. Koplik spots are 1 to 2 millimeter blue-white spots that appears on the inside of the cheek toward the molars. The rash follows approximately two days after the Koplik spots appear; the spots are usually gone two days later.

4
Koplik Spots

Photos of the Very Serious & Easily-Prevented Infection. Photo © CDC

This is another example of Koplik spots inside the mouth of someone with measles. The 1 to 2 millimeter blue-white lesions across from the molars are clearly visible. Koplik spots only occur in measles, therefore they help doctors identify the difference between a measles infection and an influenza infection.

5
The Classic Measles Face

Photos of the Very Serious & Easily-Prevented Infection. Photo © CDC

A typical measles infection follows a set course of influenza-like symptoms, to Koplik spots in the mouth, to the rash, to resolution. During the first six days of a measles infection, the infected person has red eyes and a runny nose, and cough persists throughout the entire infection. The image above shows day three of the rash and day five of symptoms. His eyes appear sick and fatigued, and he has to breathe through his mouth because of his nasal symptoms.

6
Measles Rash on Back and Legs

Photos of the Very Serious & Easily-Prevented Infection. Photo © CDC

The measles rash starts on the forehead and spreads throughout the entire body to cover the trunk and extremities. The rash is at its worst on the third day. This image shows the third day of this child's rash. The bumps cover his arms, back, buttocks and upper thighs.

7
Measles Rash on Leg

Photos of the Very Serious & Easily-Prevented Infection. Photo © CDC

This is a photo of a measles rash on the back of the legs and buttocks. The measles vaccine is the only thing that prevents this deadly infection. Once the infection is established, there is no cure, but there are several over-the-counter pain relievers and fever reducers that doctors recommend to help with symptoms.

8
Measles Close-Up - Early Rash

Photos of the Very Serious & Easily-Prevented Infection. Photo © 2009 NMSB - Custom Medical Stock Photo

This is a close-up picture of a measles rash early in the infection. The rash starts with small, red spots that are slightly raised and discrete. Compare this photo with the next one, which was taken later on.

9
Measles Close-Up - Late Rash

Photos of the Very Serious & Easily-Prevented Infection. Photo © 2009 NMSB - Custom Medical Stock Photo

This is a close-up picture of a measles rash taken later in the infection. The previous photo shows the distance, red spots that occur early in the infection, while this photo shows how the red spots have multiplied so much that they've joined together. As the rash progresses, it becomes nearly impossible to make out each individual spot. When the infection begins to subside, the rash will begin to fade first from the face and down the rest of the body. Rashes on the thighs and feet are the last to fade.

Continue Reading