Medical Jobs and Salaries

Income for Allied Health, Physicians, and Nursing Careers

How much can you earn in the medical field? As a medical professional, you can virtually earn from minimum wage to over a million dollars in annual income. There are hundreds of different types of medical jobs for a variety of education levels and salary ranges. Learn more with this quick reference list of medical jobs and average income.

1
Home Health Aide

Nurse talking to older man in home
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Average Income: $11 per hour, $23,000 per year

Education Level: High School Diploma, entry-level position.

Overview: Home health aides provide basic personal care to patients who need in-home care. Patients may be elderly, or very sick, or home bound for some other reason. Home health care is one of the most rapidly growing areas of the healthcare industry.

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2
Medical Assistant

Nurse taking patients blood pressure
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Average Income: $15 per hour, $32,000 per year

Education Level: High School Diploma, entry-level position

Overview: Medical assistants (MAs) most commonly work in physicians' offices, but may also work in a hospital setting. They assist nurses and doctors by preparing the rooms for patients, taking vital signs, escorting patients from room to room, and other basic duties.

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3
CNA - Certified Nursing Assistant or Nursing Aide

Orderly pushing wheelchair in hospital
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Average Income: $12.89 per hour, $27,000 per year.

Education Level: High School Diploma, state competency test.

Overview: Certified nursing assistants, or nursing aides, typically work in residential care facilities to assist nurses and healthcare staff with the personal care of patients, as well as in hospitals. In the past, certified nursing assistants were sometimes known as "orderlies". They may help with bathing, feeding, and moving patients, as well as changing bed linens and other basic duties.

4
Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) or Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)

Nurse reviewing medical record in examination room
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Average Income: About $20.76 per hour and $43,000 per year.

Education Level: High School Diploma or GED, plus completion of a one-year training program, passing a licensure exam (NCLEX-PN).

Overview: While once a very versatile career, the role of licensed vocational nurse is being phased out in some hospitals, in favor of registered nurses who have at least a bachelor's degree. However, the job market is still expected to grow 16 percent by 2024, as more will be needed in home health care and long-term care where many LPN jobs are found.

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5
Registered Nurse

Nurse demonstrating proper disposal of medications, syringes.
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Average Income: $34 per hour or $71,000 per year, with wages depending on experience and role.

Education Level: Associate's Degree or Bachelor's Degree in Nursing, licensure exam (NCLEX-RN).

Overview: Registered nurses make up a significant portion of the nursing workforce. The RN designation is a great start to a nursing career. It's a versatile, in-demand role that offers a great variety of job options in many different specialties of medicine. Additionally, once you obtain your RN you can build upon it with additional degrees, specializations, and certifications as you aim to grow or advance your nursing career.

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6
Physician Assistant

Happy female doctor and nurse discussing with male patient in clinic
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Average Income: About $99,000 per year.

Education Level: Master's degree from an accredited physician assistant program.

Overview: Physician assistants are advanced practitioners, who, in many states can practice with a great deal of autonomy, seeing patients and treating them independently. However, in other states, PAs must still practice under a supervising physician's license.

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7
Nurse Practitioner (NP)

Nurse typing at laptop in clinic office
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Average Income: About $101,000 per year.

Education Level: Master's degree from an accredited NP program.

Overview: Nurse practitioners are considered advanced practice nurses. They are sometimes referred to as "mid-level" providers because they have greater autonomy and a broader scope of practice than many nurses, but not as much autonomy or clinical authority as a physician.

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