Miscarriage Recovery Questions and Answers

Physical recovery after a miscarriage varies from one person to the next, often depending on how far along the pregnancy was at the time of the miscarriage. These are some common questions about the physical aspects of miscarriage and the weeks or months afterward.

Medical professionals sometimes describe an early miscarriage as being like a heavy period. But for some women, the cramps during a miscarriage can be highly intense and painful. Mild Cramping may continue for a day or two after a miscarriage. Severe cramping does not necessarily mean anything dangerous is going on, but it's a good idea to be sure ectopic pregnancy has been ruled out if you are having severe pain.

 

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A small percentage of women may develop an infection after a miscarriage. So it is important to know the signs and seek treatment if you think you may have an infection. If you develop a high fever, prolonged bleeding and cramping (longer than about 2 weeks), chills, or foul-smelling vaginal discharge, contact your doctor right away.

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The answer varies by the person. But for most women, the bleeding should subside within two weeks. Call your doctor if your bleeding lasts longer, as prolonged bleeding may be a sign of infection or incomplete miscarriage, which might require further treatment.

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Most of the time, doctors recommend avoiding sex for one to two weeks after a miscarriage due to the risk of infection.

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Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, you probably don't need to restrict your physical activity once you feel up to moving around and exercising.

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This is one of the most common questions that women have. Unfortunately, there is simply no way to predict the answer and there's a huge amount of variation among individuals.

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It's not unusual for pregnancy symptoms to persist a while even after a miscarriage until the hormones from pregnancy are cleared by the body. However, they shouldn't last longer than a few weeks. 

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The answer varies, but most women will see their hCG return to non-pregnant levels within two to four weeks. It can partly depend on how far along the pregnancy was at the time of the miscarriage.

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As with the return of your menstrual period, there is a huge amount of variation among individuals as to when ovulation and fertility will return. The point in pregnancy at which the miscarriage occurred can play a role as well.

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It's always best to discuss this question with a doctor. But there really isn't any consensus on the answer. There is no strong evidence that getting pregnant again right away increases the risk of another miscarriage. However, individual physical and emotional factors should be considered before making a decision.

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