Parenting Education Programs

Resources for Parent Educators

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Parent education has evolved from a didactic teaching model to a relationship and support model. In my work as an Intensive Family Services counselor, I am able to design an individualized parenting skills training for each client. To enhance the effectiveness of group training, parent educators may include support elements in their program.

Three Elements of an Effective Parent Education Program

Parenting education is often part of a coordinated family intervention.

I like to keep a sign-up sheet on my office door that parents can sign to see me individually after the group session. It is helpful to include paraprofessionals in the group. These important team members provide transportation, home visits, and informal support to parents. Cultural similarities between professionals, paraprofessionals and the families can mean the difference in an effective, supportive program and one that is distant and irrelevant to families.

  1. Direct Instruction

    Who is your audience? What are your goals for the program? With these questions in mind, take a look at the various structured programs. There are some good-looking programs available. Order some demo packs or introductory materials to assess the content. Is is research-based? Does it fit your audience? Does it strike a chord with you so that you can be enthusiastic and convincing with the material?

  2. Small Group Support

    Traditional small group activities are a natural fit and often included in parenting education programs. To maximise the effectiveness of your small groups, implement techniques from a support group model.

  1. Outreach and Follow-Up

Getting Started as a Parent Educator

Planning, Conducting, and Evaluating Parenting Education Programs by Karen Debord, North Carolina State Extension Service - Part of the excellent online resource from North Carolina State Parent Education Resource Notebook. Start here for your best free curriculum.

Recommended Practices - Parent Education and Support by Dr. Margaret B. Brown, University of Delaware Cooperative Extension

How to start a Parenting Program Online book from Active Parenting Publishers

Who, Me Lead a Group? Book for new parent trainers

Basic Principles of Parent Education for Low-Income Families University of Minnesota Extension Service

Free Workshop Materials for Parenting Professionals Univ. of North Texas, Center for Parent Education

More of this Feature

Resources for Parent Educators

Parenting Education Products and Programs

Parenting Education Research and Issues Resources for Parent Educators

Parent education has evolved from a didactic teaching model to a relationship and support model. In my work as an Intensive Family Services counselor, I am able to design an individualized parenting skills training for each client. To enhance the effectiveness of group training, parent educators may include support elements in their program.

Three Elements of an Effective Parent Education Program

Parenting education is often part of a coordinated family intervention. I like to keep a sign-up sheet on my office door that parents can sign to see me individually after the group session. It is helpful to include paraprofessionals in the group. These important team members provide transportation, home visits, and informal support to parents. Cultural similarities between professionals, paraprofessionals and the families can mean the difference in an effective, supportive program and one that is distant and irrelevant to families.

  1. Direct Instruction

    Who is your audience? What are your goals for the program? With these questions in mind, take a look at the various structured programs. There are some good-looking programs available. Order some demo packs or introductory materials to assess the content. Is is research-based? Does it fit your audience? Does it strike a chord with you so that you can be enthusiastic and convincing with the material?

  2. Small Group Support

    Traditional small group activities are a natural fit and often included in parenting education programs. To maximise the effectiveness of your small groups, implement techniques from a support group model.

  3. Outreach and Follow-Up

Getting Started as a Parent Educator

Planning, Conducting, and Evaluating Parenting Education Programs by Karen Debord, North Carolina State Extension Service - Part of the excellent online resource from North Carolina State Parent Education Resource Notebook. Start here for your best free curriculum.

Recommended Practices - Parent Education and Support by Dr. Margaret B. Brown, University of Delaware Cooperative Extension

How to start a Parenting Program Online book from Active Parenting Publishers

Who, Me Lead a Group? Book for new parent trainers

Basic Principles of Parent Education for Low-Income Families University of Minnesota Extension Service

Free Workshop Materials for Parenting Professionals Univ. of North Texas, Center for Parent Education

More of this Feature

Resources for Parent Educators

Parenting Education Products and Programs

Parenting Education Research and Issues

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