Peanut Butter Smoothie Recipes for Diabetics

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Peanut butter smoothies may sound too decadent to fit into a diabetes diet, but these are not the "hands-off" breakfast treats you may think they are.

Peanut butter not only helps contribute to a velvety smoothie texture, but it provides protein and a little bit of fat to help round out your meal.

You can prep your blender with these diabetic breakfast smoothie ingredients (minus the ice) in the evening, so you are ready to blend in the morning.

Peanut Butter and Jelly Smoothie Recipe

  • 1 1/2 cups skim milk
  • 6 ounces low-fat vanilla yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon low-fat peanut butter
  • 1 1/4 cups strawberries
  • 4 to 5 ice cubes

Nutrition facts: 350 calories, 45 g carbohydrates, 18% calories from fat

Peanut Butter and Banana Smoothie Recipe

  • 1 1/2 cups skim milk
  • 6 ounces low-fat vanilla yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter
  • 4 ounces banana
  • 4 to 5 ice cubes

Nutrition facts: 350 calories, 45 g carbohydrates, 18% calories from fat

Chocolate Peanut Butter Smoothie Recipe

  • 1 1/2 cups skim milk
  • 6 ounces low-fat vanilla yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter
  • 4 ounces banana
  • 1 packet no-sugars-added chocolate instant breakfast powder
  • 4 to 5 ice cubes

Nutrition facts: 450 calories, 47 g carbohydrates, 16% calories from fat

Directions for All 3 Recipes

  • Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.

More Breakfast Ideas for Diabetics

Breakfasts for Diabetics

Diabetic Instant Breakfast Smoothies Recipes

Peanut Butter in the Management of Type-2 Diabetes

Joy Bauer, Ms, RD, Women's Health Expert, says peanuts and peanut butter are naturally low in carbs, so they can help prevent blood sugar spikes, making them a perfect food for people with type 2 diabetes.

"Of course, you can’t spoon your way through the whole jar (sorry!).

Any peanut butter buff knows that [it can be] high in calories (nearly 100 per tablespoon), so it’s best to limit yourself to a 2-tablespoon serving size," Bauer says.

And not all peanut butters are created equally, so when you’re shopping, read the labels. Look for natural varieties made without added partially hydrogenated oils (trans fats), sugars and other suspect ingredients.

Bauer also says, "A study in the British Journal of Nutrition found that people who ate peanuts or peanut butter for breakfast experienced a significant reduction in the desire to eat for up to 12 hours."

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