Pictures of Famous Psychologists

Famous Psychologists and Thinkers Who Contributed to Psychology

1
Alfred Adler

Alfed Adler
1870-1937 Alfred Adler - Founder of Individual Psychology. Introduced the term "inferiority complex.". Public domain image

These pictures include some of the most famous psychologists as well as other great thinkers who made important contributions to psychology.

Alfred Adler was a Austrian doctor and originally a colleague of the famous Austrian psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud. Adler was eventually booted out of Freud's inner circle, but he want on to found his own set of theories known as Individual Psychology. He is perhaps best known for his concept of the inferiority complex. Learn more about his life and theories in this biography of Alfred Adler

2
Alfred Binet

Alfred Binet
1857-1911 Alfred Binet was a French psychologist that is famous for his development of the first widely used intelligence test. Public domain image

Alfred Binet was a French psychologist who was commissioned by the French government to create an assessment tool to identify children who needed specialized assistance at school. Binet's work led to the creation of the Binet-Simon Intelligence test. This test remains the basis for many modern tests of intelligence. Learn more about his life and career in this biography of Alfred Binet.

3
Erik Erikson

Erik Erikson
1902-1994 Erik Erikson's well-known stage theory of psychosocial development helped generate interest and inspire research on human development through the lifespan. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Erik Erikson developed an eight-stage theory of human development that looked at how people change and grow over the course of the entire lifespan. Erikson is also famous for his concept of the identity crisis. Learn more about how the events of his life helped influence his theories in this biography of Erik Erikson.

4
Sigmund Freud

Sigmund Freud
1856-1939 Sigmund Freud was the founder of psychoanalysis. He is often considered one of the best-known thinkers in psychology, but also one of the most controversial. Public domain image

Sigmund Freud may be one of the best known figures in history, but he is also one of the most controversial. He was the founder of the school of psychology known as psychoanalysis. He is also known for his concept of the unconscious mind as well as his stage theory of psychosexual development. You can learn more about his life, theories and influence on psychology in this Sigmund Freud biography.

5
G. Stanley Hall

G. Stanely Hall
1844-1924 G. Stanley Hall founded the first American psychology lab at John Hopkins University and also became the first president of the American Psychological Association (APA) in 1892. Public domain image

G. Stanley Hall founded the first American psychology lab at John Hopkins University and also became the first president of the American Psychological Association (APA) in 1892. Learn more about his life and work in this biography of G. Stanley Hall.

6
Karen Horney

Karen Horney
1885-1952 Karen Horney was a prominent psychoanalyst best-known for her theories of neurosis, feminine psychology, and and self psychology. Public domain image

Karen Horney was a prominent psychoanalyst best-known for her theories of neurosis, feminine psychology, and self psychology. While Horney was a neo-Freudian, she also challenged many of Sigmund Freud's theories about female psychology. For example, Horney countered Freud's assertion that women experience "penis envy" by suggesting that men feel "womb envy" because they are unable to bear children. Learn more about her life, career, and theories in this biography of Karen Horney. 

7
William James

William James
1842-1910 Psychologist and philosopher William James is often referred to as the father of American psychology. Public domain image

Wiliam James is known as one of the founders of American psychology and author of the classic textbook The Principles of Psychology. Learn more about his early life and influence on psychology in this William James biography.

8
Carl Jung

Carl Jung
1875-1961 Carl Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist who founded the school of thought known as analytical psychology. Public domain image

Carl Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist remember for his concept of the collective unconscious. While he was originally a protege of Freud's, he eventually split from his mentor to puruse his own theories, which he refered to as Analytical psychology. Learn more in this biography of Carl Jung.

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Abraham Maslow

Abraham Maslow
1908-1970 Abraham Maslow founded the school of thought known as humanistic psychology. Image from the Wikimedia Commons

Abraham Maslow was an American psychologist who is frequently referred to as the founder of humanistic psychology. He is perhaps best known for his famous hierarchy of needs and his emphasis on the concept of self-actualization.

10
Kurt Lewin

Kurt Lewin
1890-1947 Psychologist Kurt Lewin is often referred to as the father of modern social psychology. His pioneering theories argued that behavior is caused by both personal characteristics and the environment. Public domain image

Kurt Lewin is often referred to as the founder of modern social psychology. He is known for his studies on group dynamics, field theory and experiential learning. Learn more about Kurt Lewin in this brief biography of his life and career.

11
Hugo Munsterberg

Hugo Munsterberg
1863-1916 Hugo Munsterberg was a German psychologist who is known for his contributions to applied psychology. Despite the fact that his work still has an influence on many areas of modern psychology, his legacy was largely forgotten for many years. Public domain image

Hugo Munsterberg was a pioneer in the field of applied psychology, particularly in the areas of industrial-organizational and forensic psychology. Learn about his early life, career and major contributions to the field of psychology in this brief biography of his life: Biography of Hugo Munsterberg

12
Ivan Pavlov

Ivan Pavlov
1849-1936 Ivan Pavlov was a Russian physiologist whose research on conditioned reflexes influenced the rise of behaviorism in psychology. While not technically a psychologist, his discovery of classical conditioning makes him one of psychology's greatest pioneers. Public domain image

Ivan Pavlov was a Russian physiologist, but he became forever entwined with the field of psychology thanks to his discovery of the classical conditioning process. Pavlov's work had a major influence on other thinkers including John B. Watson and played an important role in the development of behaviorism: Biography of Ivan Pavlov

13
Jean Piaget

Jean Piaget
1896-1980 Jean Piaget (standing at right) was a psychologist best-known for his stage theory of cognitive development. He was one of the first thinkers to suggest that children think differently than adults, a concept that was considered revolutionary at the time. Fondation Jean Piaget

Jean Piaget was a Swiss psychologist who is best-remembered for his famous stage theory of cognitive development. Learn about his early life and the development of his influential theory in this overview of his life and work: Biography of Jean Piaget

14
Carl Rogers

Carl Rogers
1902-1987 Carl Rogers was a humanistic psychologist best-known for his nondirective approach to treatment known as client-centered therapy. Public domain image

Carl Rogers was a humanistic psychologist who created an influential approach to psychotherapy known as client-centered therapy. In one ranking of the most eminent psychologists of the twentieth-century, Rogers was ranked at number six. Learn more about his life and theories: Carl Rogers Biography

15
B. F. Skinner

B. F. Skinner
1904-1990 B. F. Skinner was a behaviorist famous for his research on operant conditioning and negative reinforcement. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons

B. F. Skinner's research on operant conditioning (also known as instrumental conditioning) made him one of the leaders of behaviorism, but his theories and research also made him a target for controversy. Learn more in this biography of B. F. Skinner

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Wilhelm Wundt

Wilhelm Wundt
1832-1920 Wilhelm Wundt created the first psychology lab and helped establish psychology as a subject separate from philosophy and physiology. Public domain image

Wilhelm Wundt is best-known for establishing the very first psychology lab in Leipzig, Germany. He is often credited with founding the structuralist school of thought, although it was actually his student Edward Titchener who did so. Learn more about Wund'ts life in this brief biography.

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