The Benefits of Carrot Seed Oil

Carrot seed oil is extracted from the seeds of the carrot flower (daucus carota).
Carrot seed oil is extracted from the seeds of the carrot flower. Guenter Fischer/ImageBroker/Getty Images

Carrot seed oil is a natural substance used in aromatherapy. An essential oil extracted from the seed of the Daucus carota plant, it has a sweet, earthy scent. Using carrot seed oil in aromatherapy is said to offer a variety of health benefits, including stress reduction.

In addition, carrot seed oil is sometimes used in skincare products. Proponents suggest that it may have anti-aging effects when applied to the skin.

Uses for Carrot Seed Oil

When used in aromatherapy, carrot seed oil is said to help treat the following health problems:

In addition, carrot seed oil is purported to stimulate the digestive system, enhance liver and kidney health, and promote detox.

Health Benefits of Carrot Seed Oil

Although research on the aromatherapeutic use of carrot seed oil is currently lacking, some preliminary studies show that this oil may offer certain health benefits.

In a study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology in 2008, for instance, tests on mice demonstrated that carrot seed oil may have antifungal properties.

In addition, a laboratory study published in Chemistry & Biodiversity in 2009 determined that carrot seed oil may offer antibacterial benefits.

While these findings suggest that carrot seed oil may have some beneficial effects, it's important to note that neither study tested the use of the oil as an aromatherapy remedy.

Safety

Although carrot seed oil is generally considered safe when used in aromatherapy, ingesting the oil may have toxic effects. It's also crucial to dilute carrot seed essential oil with a carrier oil prior to using it on your skin.

Additionally, some individuals may experience irritation when applying carrot seed essential oil to the skin.

Learn more about how to use carrot seed oil safely.

How to Use Carrot Seed Oil

There are a number of ways to use carrot seed oil in aromatherapy. One popular method is to blend the oil with a carrier oil (such as jojoba, sweet almond, or avocado oil), then apply the blend to your skin, add it to your bath, or use it as a massage oil.

You can also inhale the scent of carrot seed oil by sprinkling a few drops of the oil onto a cloth or tissue and breathing in, or by using an aromatherapy diffuser or vaporizer.

According to practitioners of aromatherapy, carrot seed oil blends well with essential oils of cedar, cinnamon, and geranium (as well as citrus essential oils, such as lemon and grapefruit).

Alternatives 

If you're seeking an essential oil to help lower your stress levels, consider using oils of lavender, bergamot, rose, and/or lemon. Each of these essential oils has been found to soothe stress in scientific studies.

Where to Find Carrot Seed Oil

Carrot seed oil can be purchased at many natural-foods stores and stores specializing in natural products.

You can also buy carrot seed oil online. 

Sources

Bradley BF, Brown SL, Chu S, Lea RW. "Effects of orally administered lavender essential oil on responses to anxiety-provoking film clips." Human Psychopharmacology 2009 24(4):319-30.

Hongratanaworakit T. "Relaxing effect of rose oil on humans." Nat Prod Commun. 2009 4(2):291-6.

Jabrane A, Jannet HB, Harzallah-Skhiri F, Mastouri M, Casanova J, Mighri Z. "Flower and root oils of the tunisian Daucus carota L. ssp. maritimus (Apiaceae): integrated analyses by GC, GC/MS, and 13C-NMR spectroscopy, and in vitro antibacterial activity." Chem Biodivers. 2009 Jun;6(6):881-9.

Komiya M, Takeuchi T, Harada E. "Lemon oil vapor causes an anti-stress effect via modulating the 5-HT and DA activities in mice." Behav Brain Res. 2006 Sep 25;172(2):240-9.

Peng SM, Koo M, Yu ZR. "Effects of music and essential oil inhalation on cardiac autonomic balance in healthy individuals." J Altern Complement Med. 2009 Jan;15(1):53-7.

Tavares AC, Gonçalves MJ, Cavaleiro C, Cruz MT, Lopes MC, Canhoto J, Salgueiro LR. "Essential oil of Daucus carota subsp. halophilus: composition, antifungal activity and cytotoxicity." J Ethnopharmacol. 2008 Sep 2;119(1):129-34.

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