Top Foods High in Vitamin A

Why You Need Vitamin A

Carrots and broccoli are high in vitamin A necessary for normal vision and healthy cells.
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Vitamin A is one of the fat-soluble vitamins, along with vitamins D, E, and K. It's needed for immune system function, normal vision, reproduction, and cell growth. According to the Institute of Medicine, men need about 900 micrograms and women need about 700 micrograms per day.

Although you can take vitamin A supplements, you're better off getting this essential vitamin from the foods you eat. Flip through the slideshow to see my top ten picks for vitamin A.

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are high in vitamin A.
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I love sweet potatoes because they're high in so many nutrients and so delicious. One medium sweet potato has about 900 micrograms of vitamin A, plus lots of vitamin C, iron, potassium, and fiber.

Cooked Spinach

Steamed Spinach is high in vitamin A.
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Dark green leafy vegetables are high in vitamin A, and I like spinach because it's also high in vitamin K and most minerals, including calcium and magnesium. It's also low in calories, so it makes a very healthy side dish. One cup of cooked spinach has 943 micrograms of vitamin A, so it's enough for a whole day.

Butternut Squash

Butternut squash is high in vitamin A.
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Winter squash as a group are high in vitamin A, but butternut squash contains the most. It's also high in potassium, calcium, and vitamin C. But it doesn't have too many calories. One cup of cubed cooked squash has 82 calories.


Carrots are high in vitamin A.
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Carrots are well known for being high in vitamin A. In fact, one single medium-sized carrot has 509 micrograms of vitamin A. Carrots are also high in calcium, potassium and vitamin K.  I like raw carrots with a little veggie dip or hummus, but they're also good on salads. Cook carrots are tasty too.


Cantaloupe is high in vitamin A.
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Cantaloupe is high in vitamin A, and it makes my list because it's so versatile - it's perfect in summer fruit salads or all by itself. One cup of cantaloupe cubes has 270 micrograms of vitamin A. It's also high in vitamin C and potassium and also a good source of magnesium.

Red Bell Peppers

Red peppers are high in vitamin A.
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Red bell peppers (or sweet bell peppers) are nutritious and flavorful. One pepper has only 37 calories and 187 micrograms of vitamin A (and more than a day's worth of vitamin C. I also like how they lend a beautiful red color to salads and side dishes.


Mangos are high in vitamin A.
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One mango has 181 micrograms of vitamin A and more than a day's worth of vitamin C and a healthy dose of vitamin K. I chose mangos for this list because I love the flavor, and they're one of my favorite fruit smoothie ingredients.

Black Eyed Peas

Black eyed peas are high in vitamin A.
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Black eyed peas don't have as much vitamin A as the dark green, orange and red vegetables and fruit, but one cup does have about 60 micrograms. It also has lots of fiber, protein, and a fair amount of vitamin K, all for about 160 calories. I think legumes are a healthy alternative to red meat -- even if you're not a vegetarian.


Apricots are high in vitamin A.
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Apricots are high in vitamin A and potassium, but low in calories. One cup of apricot slices has 158 micrograms vitamin A, 79 calories and over 3 grams of fiber. An apricot makes a good snack all by itself or with a handful of nuts.

Cooked Broccoli

Broccoli is high in vitamin A.
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Broccoli is another one of those foods that are loaded with so many vitamins, minerals, and fiber. One cup of cooked and chopped broccoli has about 120 micrograms vitamin A and only 54 calories.


Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. "Dietary Reference Intakes: Vitamins."

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. "Vitamin A Fact Sheet for Health Professionals."

United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28.

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