How Exercise Can Improve Your Waistline and Your Health

Man running in the forest
Micky Wiswedel/Stocksy United

What if there was one thing you could do to live longer, have more energy, potentially avoid heart disease, cancer, stroke, and injury – all while boosting your sex life, mood, self-confidence, and body image. Would you do it? That one thing does exist. Unfortunately, there are too many of us who aren't taking advantage of it.

Exercise is one of the few activities you can do that can improve every aspect of your life, body, and mind.

If you're like many of us, you struggle to find the motivation to exercise regularly, but thinking about how it can improve your life may be just what you need to take that first step.

Exercise Helps You Lose Weight and Prevent Obesity

Besides watching your calories, studies show that exercise is one of the most powerful tools for weight loss. The calories you burn during cardio and strength training help you lose weight, prevent future weight gain, and avoid obesity.

This is critical since being overweight or obese can put you at risk for a variety of health problems such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, gallstones, depression, low self-esteem, and more.

How to Exercise for Weight Loss

Exercise Protects You from Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for American adults. Exercise not only protects you from heart disease, it can actually change how your heart works, making it stronger, more efficient, and better able to function as you age.

What's even better is that a little exercise, regardless of whether you lose weight, can make a difference. Exercising for your heart can start with as little as 20 minutes of exercise most days of the week. Being active can also help you avoid things that strain your heart, like being overweight, having high blood pressure, or being highly stressed.

Exercise can even help you recover from heart attacks and prevent or reduce the risk of future heart problems.

Diabetes Prevention and Management

Of all the health problems we suffer from, diabetes can be the most maddening. In the simplest terms, diabetes affects how your body digests food. Your body can't break down sugar, which leads to high glucose levels and potential health problems like nerve damage, kidney failure, vision problems, heart disease and depression.

The top risk factor for getting type 2 diabetes is being obese, which is one reason that exercise is such a powerful tool. Exercise also helps manage blood glucose levels and enhance insulin sensitivity. In fact, one study showed that high intensity interval training may improve insulin action in sedentary adults, and another found that adding muscle helps manage glucose levels and decrease the risk of complications due to diabetes.

Exercise Improves Your Sex Life

We bet you never thought hitting the treadmill could have this effect.

It may sound like an infomercial promise, but exercise can indeed improve your sex life. There's a long list of the benefits exercisers may experience in the bedroom, including:

  • enhanced sexual performance and pleasure
  • increased sex drive; more frequent sex
  • increased sexual satisfaction
  • fewer problems with erectile dysfunction

A healthy exercise program can also contribute to higher self-esteem and more confidence, two characteristics that draw people to you, both physically and emotionally. And don't forget, sex burns calories too. A 150-pound person can burn about 72 calories during 15 minutes of vigorous sex. Go for an hour and you'll burn up to 288 calories.

Exercise Lowers High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, which is considered anything over 149/90 mm Hg, can contribute to a number of health problems, including coronary heart disease, stroke, and congestive heart failure. Losing weight and watching your salt and alcohol intake are the best ways to lower your blood pressure, and studies have found that 3 to 5 ​moderate-intensity workouts a week (30 to 60 minutes each) is sufficient to reduce high blood pressure. Regular exercise may even protect you from developing high blood pressure, which can be a problem as we age.

Exercise Makes You Smarter

Exercise not only strengthens your body, it can also strengthen your mind. One study found that moderate exercise by older adults can reduce the odds of mild cognitive impairment by 30 percent to 40 percent.

Some experts believe that exercise can, in fact, keep our minds sharp because it improves circulation throughout the body and the brain, which boosts your attention and ability to concentrate.

Exercise may even protect us from developing Alzheimer's disease. In one study, researchers found that older adults who exercise at least 3 times a week are less likely to develop dementia.

Exercise can even make you more productive at work. People who exercise during the day perform better, manage their time more efficiently, and are mentally sharper.

Exercise Gives You More Energy

It may be ironic, but if you've ever felt too tired to workout, exercise is one thing that may cure you. Getting enough sleep, reducing stress, and eating a nutritious diet are all important for energy, but one major factor is movement. Studies show that exercise increases feelings of energy and lessens feelings of fatigue. Exercise also teaches the body how to produce more energy, making it more efficient at burning fat.

Get started:

  • Start small: Move more all day – take the stairs, stretch, or take short walks.
  • Warm up: Give your body more time to make the transition to exercise by gradually increasing your pace.
  • Stay hydrated: Dehydration can contribute to feelings of fatigue.

8. Exercise Reduces LDL Cholesterol and Raises HDL Cholesterol

There are a number of lifestyle changes you can make that can help reduce bad cholesterol (LDL) and raise good cholesterol (HDL), including eating healthy, quitting smoking and regular exercise. Being sedentary is a major risk factor for high cholesterol, but one study found that walking or jogging about 15 to 20 miles a week can lower LDL (bad cholesterol) and raise HDL (good cholesterol).

Other studies have found that working at or above 75 percent of your maximum heart rate, which is a higher intensity, is the best way to raise HDL and lower LDL.

Interval training is one way to introduce high intensity training into your workouts. By alternating work intervals with recovery time, you get the benefit of high intensity training without the discomfort of long, hard workouts.

9. Exercise Decreases Symptoms of Mild to Moderate Depression

Depression is frustratingly common for many of us, and while there are medications and therapies that can help, exercise is another method of treatment that can provide relief. Studies have shown that exercise can help you fight mild to moderate depression because it:

  • lifts your mood and gives you energy
  • offers distraction from your worries
  • helps you feel more confident and in control
  • releases feel-good hormones while reducing stress

Even clinically depressed people can find help through exercise.

In one study, depressed patients who exercised ranked it as "the most important element in comprehensive treatment programs for depression."

Any type of exercise, including cardio, weight-training, and mind/body activities like yoga, can work.

10. Exercise Reduces Stress and Anxiety

Stress and anxiety can take a toll on your body, mind, and emotional well-being, but exercise can help even if you're experiencing chronic stress.

Studies show that consistent exercisers manage their stress more effectively and tend to have lower levels of stress than people who don't exercise. Exercise is also a great way to prevent stress, especially if you consistently exercise at least 3 times a week for 20 or more minutes.

Anxiety is another problem that often accompanies stress and depression, leaving you feeling agitated, uneasy, and struggling to calm down. Studies show that aerobic exercise is one way to reduce anxiety, although you'll want to experiment with different intensity levels to find what works best for you.

11. Exercise Reduces Your Risk of Stroke

Another health problem that can sometimes be prevented with exercise is stroke. Strokes can happen when blood can't circulate to the brain, and the three major risk factors include high blood pressure, diabetes and smoking. Exercise can help with both high blood pressure and diabetes, and it may actually reduce your risk of experiencing a stroke. Studies show that people who are moderately active have a 20 percent lower risk of stroke and, if you're more active, those numbers only get better.

Exercise can mitigate those contributing factors and may widen the interior of blood vessels, contributing to better circulation.

Exercise can also help people recovering from a stroke. One study found that stroke survivors who participated in a walking program were able to walk faster and longer and had better mobility than non-exercisers.

12. Exercise Reduces Your Risk of Certain Types of Cancer

Another great benefit of exercise is a reduced risk of certain types of cancer, including colon cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, and multiple myeloma. One study found that moderate to vigorous exercise offers the best protection and that exercisers have a 30 to 40 percent reduced risk for colon cancer as opposed to non-exercisers. Another study suggests that modifying our lifestyles can reduce the threat of cancer. By eating a healthy diet, staying at a healthy weight, exercising, watching your alcohol intake and quitting smoking, you may actually protect yourself from some types of cancer as you get older.

13. Exercise Helps Protect You from Osteoporosis

Bone health is a major concern for women, especially those who are postmenopausal. A number of things can contribute to osteoporosis, including smoking, drinking too much, and a family history of osteoporosis, but one preventable cause is being sedentary.

Experts believe that children who exercise can build strong bones and carry that strength into adulthood, giving them some protection against osteoporosis. As adults, we can maintain strong bones and, perhaps, build stronger bones by choosing weight-bearing activities like running, walking, aerobics or any other movement that involves impact. High-intensity strength training is another way to build stronger bones, all while building lean muscle tissue and burning calories.

Most evidence shows that working at higher intensities and greater frequency is the best way to increase bone density. This 30-Day Quick Start Guide can help you get started.

14. Exercise Boosts Your Self-Esteem, Body Image, and Confidence

Many studies show that exercise not only gives you energy, it can actually improve self-esteem and confidence. This isn't surprising when you consider that how we feel about ourselves is often wrapped up in how we look, how satisfied we are with ourselves, and how competent we perceive ourselves to be. Exercise can improve all of those things. By improving your strength, endurance, balance and coordination, you feel stronger and more confident.

One study published in the Journal of Health Psychology found that even a small amount of exercise can improve body image. Researchers reviewed more than 50 studies and found that people who exercise are less critical of their bodies than non-exercisers, regardless of their weight loss results.

15. Exercise Boosts Your Mood

If you're feeling cranky, one of the best things you can do to improve your mood is exercise. We're not sure exactly how it works, but one study shows that just 10 minutes of aerobic exercise can reduce tension, fatigue and anger while increasing feelings of vitality and energy. Cardio seems to be the best way to boost your mood, but other activities can work as well.

10-Minute Workouts to Lift Your Mood

16. Exercise Protects Seniors from Injury

Falling is a major source of injury and, sometimes, death for older people. One study estimates that falls cause 90 percent of hip fractures. Beyond simple aging, we can fall and hurt ourselves because of loss of muscle, balance and coordination. If you don't exercise, that loss of muscle can contribute to weakness and inflexibility, which can affect your ability to move around with strength and confidence.

Studies have shown that seniors can prevent falls and maintain a higher level of functioning with exercise. Working on your balance, flexibility, endurance and strength will improve your quality of life as you get older while protecting you from injury.

More about Exercise for Seniors.

17. It Helps You Live Better and Longer

If you've ever wished there were such a thing as a fountain of youth, I'm thrilled to make your wishes come true. Studies have shown that regular exercise can actually add years to your life, whether you start exercising at 15 or 50. Even better, those extra years are less likely to include disability, which means a higher quality of life as you age.

18. Helps Treat and Manage Back Pain

Back pain is a common problem, and because there are different causes, there isn't one therapy that works for every person. However, for those with back pain from bad posture or too much sitting, stretching and strengthening the back may be one way to reduce pain.

Researchers are also studying yoga as a helpful treatment. One study found that Iyengar yoga reduced pain, disability, and the use of pain medication in study participants.

More about yoga and back pain.

19. It Keeps You Fit for Seasonal Activities

If you like to ski in the winter or hike in the summer, regular exercise is a must for giving your body a strong foundation for these kinds of irregular activities.

There are a number of things we do that depend on the season and the weather, which can set you up for an injury if you don't maintain a base level of fitness. Regular exercise can give you the stamina, strength and endurance you need for seasonal activities like shoveling snow, raking leaves, long bike rides or canoe trips, backpacking, skiing or snowboarding.

20. It Helps Your Kids Stay Active

Whether your kids exercise now and into adulthood often depends on you. One study shows that girls are more likely to exercise when they have knowledge about exercise and when their mothers are active. Boys exercise more when they have exercise knowledge and when they get information from their dads. Being a good role model means your kids have a better shot at a healthy, active future.

Sources:

Blumenthal, James A., et al. Effects of Exercise Training on Older Patients With Major Depression. Arch Intern Med. 1999;159:2349-2356.

Campbell A; Hausenblas H. Effects of Exercise Interventions on Body Image. J Health Psyc. 2009;14(6): 780-792.

Carter N; Kannus P; Khan K.M. Exercise in the Prevention of Falls in Older People: A Systematic Literature Review Examining the Rationale and the Evidence. Sports Med. 2001 June;31(6): 427-438(12).

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Promoting Active Lifestyles Among Older Adults. Accessed Jan 28, 2010.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington. The longitudinal effects of depression on physical activity. Gen Hosp Psych. 2009 Jul-Aug;31(4):306-15. Epub 2009 May 13.

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