What Is Rhinostat?

Rhinostat for Rebound Congestion
Rebound Congestion. Echo/Cultura/Getty Images

Rhinostat is a nasal spray kit meant to assist people in gradually weaning off of topical decongestants. It was created to help patients suffering from rebound congestion (rhinitis medicamentosa or nasal spray addiction). A brief explanation of this condition is that when certain types of nasal decongestants are used for longer than three days they can actually end up causing congestion and the only way the individual finds relief from this congestion is by using the very product that is responsible for their symptoms in the first place.

This cycle can be hard to break but many medical professionals recommend gradually decreasing the dose of the offending decongestant, Rhinostat is designed to assist in this process.

There is not a specific test for diagnosing rebound congestion. Your physician will make a determination of this by asking questions related to the frequency and duration of nasal decongestants. Visual examination of your nasal mucous membranes will also likely appear to be red and swollen. Following the instructions on the bottles of nasal decongestants can dramatically reduce the likelihood of suffering from rebound congestion.

There are four different types of Rhinostat. The type of Rhinostat that is best for you will depend on the kind of nasal spray you have been overusing.

The kit includes two bottles. The first contains an exact formulation of the decongestant you have been using. The second contains this same formula minus the active ingredient.

By combining the bottles, the dosage of decongestant given can be more precisely controlled by the patient.

Review of Research

There is a lack of research in relation to Rhinostat due to the use of currently FDA approved medications. Current guidelines and research shows that discontinuation of the nasal decongestant is the best thing you can do.

However the rebound congestion may be so severe that you may want treat the congestion in order to sleep or function. In this case use of a intranasal glucocorticoid like fluticasone has been shown to treat the symptoms and may help to minimize the effects of rebound congestion. Be aware however that due to the removal of the nasal decongestant, you are still likely to experience a worsening of symptoms. This does not mean that fluticasone has failed.

Variations of Rhinostat:

  • oxymetazoline
  • Phenylepherine hcl In
  • Xylometazoline hcl
  • Naphazoline hcl (rarely used in the United States)

Rhinostat is not a new medication. The manufacturers claim that the way they dispense their nasal sprays makes it easier to control the dose, and therefore makes it easier to wean a person off of the nasal spray they are "addicted to". Rhinostat should only be used under the supervision of a physician. Side effects of this medication are specific to the active ingredient (above).

Source:

Rhinostat.com. How Does Rhinostat Work? Accessed: April 28, 2010 from http://www.rhinostat.com/how_it_works.htm

Lieberman, P.L. (2015). Chronic nonallergic rhinitis. Accessed October 30, 2015 from http://www.uptodate.com

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