TNF alpha

TNF alpha: protein manufactured by white blood cells

TNF Alpha
TNF Alpha. Wikimedia Commons

TNF alpha is a protein manufactured by white blood cells to stimulate and activate the immune system in response to infection or cancer.

Overproduction of this compound, also known as tumor necrosis factor, can lead to disease where the immune systems acts against healthy tissues, such as psoriasis. Some treatments for these diseases utilize drugs that bind and inactivate TNF alpha, thereby reducing unhealthy inflammation.

What is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a common skin condition that changes the life cycle of skin cells. Psoriasis causes cells to build up rapidly on the surface of the skin. The extra skin cells form thick, silvery scales and itchy, dry, red patches that are sometimes painful.

Psoriasis is a persistent, long-lasting (chronic) disease. There may be times when your psoriasis symptoms get better alternating with times your psoriasis worsens.

The primary goal of treatment is to stop the skin cells from growing so quickly. While there isn't a cure, psoriasis treatments may offer significant relief. Lifestyle measures, such as using a nonprescription cortisone cream and exposing your skin to small amounts of natural sunlight, also may improve your psoriasis symptoms.

Psoriasis Symptoms

Psoriasis signs and symptoms can vary from person to person but may include one or more of the following:

  • Red patches of skin covered with silvery scales
  • Small scaling spots (commonly seen in children)
  • Dry, cracked skin that may bleed
  • Itching, burning or soreness
  • Thickened, pitted or ridged nails
  • Swollen and stiff joints

Psoriasis patches can range from a few spots of dandruff-like scaling to major eruptions that cover large areas.

Most types of psoriasis go through cycles, flaring for a few weeks or months, then subsiding for a time or even going into complete remission.

Risk Factors For Psoriasis

Anyone can develop psoriasis, but these factors can increase your risk of developing the disease:

  • Family history. Perhaps the most significant risk factor for psoriasis is having a family history of the disease. Having one parent with psoriasis increases your risk of getting the disease, and having two parents with psoriasis increases your risk even more.
  • Viral and bacterial infections. People with HIV are more likely to develop psoriasis than people with healthy immune systems are. Children and young adults with recurring infections, particularly strep throat, also may be at increased risk.
  • Stress. Because stress can impact your immune system, high stress levels may increase your risk of psoriasis.
  • Obesity. Excess weight increases the risk of psoriasis. Plaques associated with all types of psoriasis often develop in skin creases and folds.
  • Smoking. Smoking tobacco not only increases your risk of psoriasis but also may increase the severity of the disease. Smoking may also play a role in the initial development of the disease.

    Reference:
    Mayo Clinic. Psoriasis. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/psoriasis/basics/definition/con-20030838

    Continue Reading