Yogurt Chia Pudding With Blueberry Compote

Yogurt Chia Pudding With Blueberry Compote
Stephanie Lang, MS, RDN, CDN
Total Time 10 min
Prep 10 min, Cook 0 min
Yield 2 servings (254 calories each)

When the blueberries in this recipe cook down with just a touch of sugar, they develop a deep, sweet flavor that complements the tart Greek yogurt.

Blueberries and other dark colored fruits and vegetables are rich in phytochemicals, naturally occurring plant (phyto, in Greek) chemicals, particularly anthocyanins and polyphenols. These phytochemicals may reduce risk of cancer and other conditions like heart disease, so aim to include dark blue and purple fruits and vegetables in your diet at least three days a week to reap the benefits.

Additionally, the chia seeds in this recipe make it a healthier treat. They are a great vegetarian source of essential omega-3 fatty acids, which may help reduce inflammation in the body. Between the berries, chia seeds, and Greek yogurt, you've got a sweet inflammation-busting dish to enjoy for breakfast, dessert, or as a snack.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup blueberries, fresh or frozen
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/4 cup chia seeds
  • 2/3 cup fat-free or low-fat plain Greek yogurt
  • 2/3 cup water

Preparation

1. For the compote: In a medium saucepan, combine the blueberries and sugar and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the berries just begin to soften and release their juices. Remove from heat and let stand and cool to room temperature. Once cool, place into a jar, seal the lid and store in the refrigerator until ready to use.

2. For the chia mixture: Combine chia seeds, yogurt and water in one large or two smaller jars.

Stir, let sit for 5 minutes, then stir again, screw on the lid(s) and place in the refrigerator overnight.

3. The next morning, scoop the chia mixture into a bowl and top with half of the compote, or layer the chia mixture and compote in the jar.

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

You're not limited to blueberries for this recipe. Try it with cherries, blackberries, raspberries, or even chopped plums instead for a berry-good twist. All of these berries and dark colored fruits provide natural sweetness and contain the same anthocyanin and polyphenol antioxidant properties as blueberries. Plus, the calorie count isn't all that different.

Cooking and Serving Tips

During the summer months, berries are at at their peak season and it is best to use fresh berries. However, the rest of the year when berries are not readily grown, aim to use frozen berries. Frozen berries are a beneficial type of processed food—they're typically frozen at the height of their ripeness so as to preserve their cancer-fighting properties and delicious flavor all year long.

And if you want to enjoy this treat all week long, go ahead and double or quadruple the recipe, prepare everything on one night, and divide into individual grab-and-go containers.

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